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Compare the death of Piggy in the following - 'Lord of the flies' the novel by William Golding, 'Lord of the Flies' film by Peter Brooke (1961), 'Lord of the Flies' film by Harry Hook (1994).

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Introduction

Compare the death of Piggy in the following: 'Lord of the flies' the novel by William Golding 'Lord of the Flies' film by Peter Brooke (1961) 'Lord of the Flies' film by Harry Hook (1994) 'Lord of the Flies', written in 1954 by William Golding, is a classic novel about a group of boys being stranded on a island and the way in which they change due to the change in society that they experience. In this essay I will be comparing the scene of death of Piggy in three different texts, the novel itself and the two films created by Peter Brooke and Harry Hook. The background to Peter Brooke's adaptation was the Second World War, or maybe a futuristic war that he predicted to happen or invented. William Golding has maybe used it in the context of the Second World War to give this novel the base that these upper-middle class boys have become stranded on the island due to their evacuation from Britain. Indeed, the simple yet effective photo montage at the beginning of Peter Brooke's film shows activities at middle class English schools prior to the war and then entwines them with images of the V2 rockets and the Holocaust. This symbolises the link with WWII right from the start of the film. Harry Hook's update uses the Vietnam War as a setting for his film, probably to connect more with the American people, as this film was American. This shown in the way Hook has used American military cadets instead of middle-class English schoolboys. ...read more.

Middle

This loss of society is shown because of Ralph, the good-tempered boy, being brought down to jack's level of using fights to settle problems. Not that Jack needed much provoking. The evil and sinister character of Roger plays a significant role in the death of Piggy in each of the three texts. In the novel he is first introduced when he is throwing rocks at younger boys but the influence of society still had a hold on him, as he didn't actually make the rocks hit the boys. We are never told of the physical appearance of Roger until this scene when he 'with a sense of delirious abandonment, leaned all his weight on the lever'. In Brooke's film he is introduced early. We see his face in front of the sky making him seem like an almost god like figure. Maybe it is a representation of how appearances can be deceptive and even someone who is shown to look good can be evil, sinister and capable of committing something like murder. Brook shows Roger has having black paint around his eyes and mouth, enhancing the feeling of evil and destructiveness. His intentions are clear as the scene advances as the camera is on him for a long time. His hand is shown as going towards the lever, building p the tension when eventually it climaxes and a great force is used to send the rock down on top of Piggy. In Hook's film Roger is not so well shown as he is hidden behind the cliff edge. ...read more.

Conclusion

All three texts used to demonstrate the story of 'Lord of the Flies' are shown differently and used to have different affects due to the time period they were produced in. In my opinion the Peter Brooke film is directed the best as it follows the book much more accurately and follows very closely what would have appealed to the audience of this time. Harry Hook's version of the book doesn't follow the story line and tries to appeal to today's' audience. But as someone of today's time period I don not feel that this was a successful film and the feelings of horror and anticipation are lost. I like the book as the way in which Gilding writes builds up an image of what each character looks like and the events that took place. To me this means that the book is successfully written. The book was written just after World War 2 and the devastation of the loss of community at this time was shown through the story and the way the characters adapted to their surroundings. The people of this time period could probably relate to the savagery and murders committed for no reason, e.g.- the persecution of the Jews because they were Jews - the death of Piggy because he was different. I also like the way in each text, social stereotypes were included, mainly with Piggy's character, as this helped make the storyline more real. Sophie Wright Media Coursework 18th October 2003 Lord of the Flies ...read more.

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