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Compare the Poems 'Babysitting' and 'Catrin' with Particular Emphasis on How the Poet has Dealt with Adult-Child Relationships

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Introduction

Compare the Poems 'Babysitting' and 'Catrin' with Particular Emphasis on How the Poet has Dealt with Adult-Child Relationships 'Catrin' and 'Baby-sitting' are both written by the poet Gillian Clarke. 'Catrin' is a poem with a much softer tone, represented in the long sentences and the calm atmosphere it creates when reflecting back in the past. In contrast 'Baby-sitting is a poem with a much more emotional feel to it, containing more than one topic: for example in 'Catrin' it was looking at her daughter in the past as a infant and then in the present as an older less needy child, however in 'Babysitting it is not only looking at her anxiety of the baby-sitting caring for a unknown baby but also from the perspective of the baby being left with no familiar figures surrounding it. 'Catrin' is a poem concerning the contrast between a baby's (daughter 'Catrin') dependency on her mother (poet, Gillian Clarke) with the independence and defiance felt by an older child. On the other hand 'Baby-sitting', instead of talking about the natural and instinctive love from a mother to her own child it discusses the anxiety she feels for another's child, whom she does not know, strangers. ...read more.

Middle

In both 'Baby-sitting' and 'Catrin' Clarke uses alliteration, for example 'Red Rope' and Absolute Abandonment', this gives both force and power to the sentence and really marks out the importance of the sentence. There are different techniques used in the two poems, for example in 'Baby-sitting' there are much fewer metaphors than in 'Catrin' and Clarke uses reparation of the phrase 'It will not come' in 'Baby-sitting' to give the effect at the end of the poem but does not apply the same technique in any place of the poem 'Catrin'. In comparison though, both poems have similar punctuation and sometimes finish sentences on the next line, this technique worked well on the phrase 'Absolute Abandonment' in particular as by starting a new line after absolute it did give that feeling of abandonment and then ending with a full stop after the first word. It was also cleverly used it in the phrase 'taking turn' as it sounds and looks as though the sentence is turning by putting the turn on the next line. ...read more.

Conclusion

Although both poems are written by Gillian Clarke and on the surface appear to cover the same field they both take different directions, the interpretation differs. 'Babysitting' is dealing with a more original idea using strong imagery and possibly written after 'Catrin'. One thing that could identify them is, however, her use of language techniques such as dropping the last word in a sentence on to the next line. In the poems we look for similarities when they are next to each other, these are few and hard to see and, when I compared the two poems my interpretations did not change. In my opinion I think that 'Catrin' is more restricted with simpler language and has fewer interpretations that can be made whereas in 'Baby-sitting' is doing the opposite, it is projecting forwards how people feel in other situations, such as grieving for someone special, while still talking about baby sitting. I also like the title 'Baby-sitting' because it is simple but gives completely the opposite meaning, because you would consider a title like that to be a simple story about a baby-sitter possibly on her first time baby-sitting but this contrary to the poem's true content, which is much deeper. ...read more.

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