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Compare the poems 'Out-Out' and 'Mid-Term Break'

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Introduction

Compare the poems 'Out-Out' and 'Mid-Term Break' The Two poems I will be comparing are Out-Out by Robert Frost, and Mid-Term Break by Seamus Heaney. Out-Out is the story of a young boy working on a Timber yard who has an accident and dies. The poem describes this as an almost everyday occurrence, and portrays the reactions of the family around him; that is that they carry on as if nothing has happened. Mid-Term Break approaches death from the other angle. An adolescent boys younger brother dies in a car accident, and on arriving home he feels he is being viewed in disdain for not being there to protect his sibling. This poem portrays the feeling of the older brother and his emotions before and after the accident. 'Mid-Term Break' by the poet Seamus Heaney is about a personal experience that he when he was younger encountered. It deals with the issues of life and death in a family and also how different people cope. The title at first suggests that the poem is going to be about a holiday, but as you get into the poem further, you realise that the title has a far deeper and darker meaning... In the first stanza, we learn that Seamus Heaney is in a college sick bay waiting to be picked up. You get suspicious when he is being picked up his neighbour, which could indicate that something serious has happened. ...read more.

Middle

Is that in the way that "they are easy to make so of little value" or "some candles are shorter than other (some die earlier than others). Maybe it is both. "Out, out-" is a narrative poem by Robert Frost; about how a young boy dies due because he isn't big enough to hold the saw. The poem, as the above is about death, but also has a hint against Child Labour. The poem is not formatted in stanzas as like "Mid-Term Break". It is formatted without any gaps; it is continuous. However it does have breaks within it, but it creates these breaks not with stanza and verse, but with plosive words, and shocking images. It is continuous, time does not stop, you cannot stop it, and you can not reverse the parts you want to. The narrative begins with; "The Buzz saw snarled and rattled in the yard". This is relevant to the poem as it is using personification, suggesting the saw is alive, and maybe in some way human, or more in running with human fears, snake, crocodile, or lion. The quote also uses onomatopoeia. The next few lines merely describe what the saw is doing. Following that is some imagery - "Sweet-scented stuff" and "Five mountain ranges one behind the other". These are two examples of imagery, they set the scene and also make you aware of the surroundings. ...read more.

Conclusion

this had changed considerably with the next generation. Maternal pride and attachment developed within the first years and couples had fewer children because there was no need. Money had a chance of quickly becoming irrelevant and he money they had was of enough value to support their family on the parents' wages so they didn't need the children to work to help support them. Also, of course contraception had helped the number of children. I feel that many people think that the people at the timber yard are heartless and cruel but that is because we are applying modernistic values to the time of "Out Out". Our values are that everyone is special and couples rarely have more than two children. They also earn more than enough to support these children in excess. Back then every child was a worker, an asset, and one that could be easily replaced. Both poems approach death in the correct syntax of the time, both with different moral values in mind, and both are subject to modern values. My personal preference is of "Out Out" because I feel that it is better written and described, and also I am highly against people imposing their values one other people who they do not apply to. This is especially a problem in history where people are shocked how people have acted, and are angry even at our own country and our leaders, purely because they use empathy incorrectly. They themselves and their values in someone's shoes where their values do not apply. Both poems are good, but "Out Out" is more effective. ...read more.

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