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Compare the pre twentieth century ‘A Christmas Carol’ by Charles Dickens with the twentieth century play ‘ An inspector Calls’ by J.B. Priestly focusing particularly attention on plots, character and authorial intent; why do you think

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Introduction

Compare the pre twentieth century 'A Christmas Carol' by Charles Dickens with the twentieth century play ' An inspector Calls' by J.B. Priestly focusing particularly attention on plots, character and authorial intent; why do you think the two pieces of literature written at such different times are so similar? Both of these stories were written over a hundred years apart from each other but the message that comes across is a story about morals. A lot of people think that the stories are about stating the rich verses the poor. I don't see this, as there is a lot more to the stories than this in both 'IC' and 'CC'. In these stories the message that is brought to our attention is that what ever people do or what they have done they always deserve a second chance. ...read more.

Middle

These two both think that people who are poor have to work all around the clock and don't understand that everyone is equal and some people (the rich) are more fortunate than others. Another example of their similarities as they look for any that could lead to a business opportunity. In 'IC' Birling shows that he looks at Sheila and Gerald's marriage is not a moment of joy but a huge business opportunity. This would greatly benefit him in the long run. "We look forward for the day when Croft's and Birling's are no longer competing but working together." This compares well with when Scrooge in 'CC' says "He was an excellent man of business, on the very day of the funeral" on the funeral of a long life partner, which would usually be very upsetting but instead jumps at the chance to keep his business going on his funeral. ...read more.

Conclusion

Scrooge announces strictly "I can't afford to make people to make idle people merry" to one of young man who is trying to collect money for charity. He thinks that as some people are poor they cannot be happy. We assume that he thinks that people have to be rich to be happy. A good example of this is when Scrooge says to his nephew "What have you to be merry?" Scrooges nephew replying, "What right do you have be dismal?" sharply. This shows that just having family and friends with you at Christmas should be enough to make you happy. In 'IC' Birling announces, " If you don't come down sharply on these people then they'd soon be asking for the earth." Here he generalises his factory workers as greedy. This brings through his experience that he actually has of 'normal' people. ...read more.

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