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Compare the Techniques that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Ruth Rendell use to present the Nature of the Murderers, the Motives and the Consequences.

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Introduction

Compare the Techniques that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Ruth Rendell use to present the Nature of the Murderers, the Motives and the Consequences. The two books I am going to compare are 'The Hound Of The Baskervilles' by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and 'People Don't Do Such Things' by Ruth Rendell. 'The Hound Of The Baskervilles' is an intricate crime detection novel written pre-war in the 18th Century, where Doyle relays facts to the reader incredibly cryptically and at strategic points. These facts, if pieced together correctly, eventually inform the reader of the result of the book and what characters fit in where. It starts with Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson solving, really a puzzle rather than a mystery as they find a walking stick left in their office by someone unknown. This however develops into a full-scale mystery that involves murder, betrayal, dishonesty and revenge. This type of novel was popular around the time of being first published because they somehow matched true stories of the time, for example, Jack the Ripper. ...read more.

Middle

This method of putting someone else in the picture of committing the murder is much more modern as this is what generally tends to happen in modern day society. Mythical creatures roaming moors are somewhat absent from what we seem plausible. In both 'The Hound Of The Baskervilles' and 'People Don't Do Such Things' the murderers are both killing a member of their family but for very different reasons. The motive of Stapleton in 'The Hound Of The Baskervilles' is to get rid of family members blocking the way between him and the his potential inheritance thus deriving a large amount of personal gain. The narrator in 'People Don't Do Such Things however kills a member of his family because of depression. He is depressed because he was under the illusion that his marriage was perfect and that a close friend of him and his wife was nothing more but this turned out to be wrong. This eventual false friendship was unknowingly cleverly set up by Reeve - the close friend - and was manipulated to his advantage. ...read more.

Conclusion

I think this is evident in both 'The Hound Of The Baskervilles' and 'People Don't Do Such Things' as the language used in 'The Hound Of The Baskervilles' is clearly different from that used in 'People Don't Do Such Things'. This type of differential between the two stories can greatly affect how parts of the story are relayed to the reader. As I live in the modern world I can relate to and understand 'People Don't Do Such Things' much better than 'The Hound Of The Baskervilles' because of the differences between the way of life in the 18th Century when 'The Hound Of The Baskervilles' was written and relatively close to the present when 'People Don't Do Such Things' was written. Overall I think that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Ruth Rendell both present the nature of the murders, the motives and the consequences in a definitive and individual way but both methods are separate from each other simply because of the difference in the surrounding societies' believes and understandings. Chris Simmons 10MA 5th June 2002 ...read more.

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