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Compare the way the novel and the film of Lord of the Flies present the scene: The death of Piggy

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Introduction

Lord of the flies' media coursework essay. Lord of the flies was originally a novel by William Golding, but it has inspired filmmakers to produce films based on the storyline. Two particular versions of the film were made in the 1960's and 1990's. The two versions, although set along the same storyline, are very different in their own ways, obviously there are also a lot of similarities as well. This essay will compare those differences and similarities in one particular scene: The death of Piggy. The original storyline begins with a group of children from different backgrounds congregating on an island after their plane crashes on a uninhabited secluded island. The group devise a scheme to ensure they remain a robust tribe, but the tension caused on the island becomes unbearable and most of the children become savages. Jack Merridew operated the tribe, known to the others as the 'savages'. Eventually every child on the island united with Jacks group, except Piggy and Ralph. The 1st main death in the novel is of a young boy named Simon; he was brutally murdered by the savages in a hectic heat of the moment. The 'Savages' were chanting about killing a pig for them to feast on. One member of the group also murders piggy, where he is struck by a bolder. ...read more.

Middle

In the novel Piggy is of a lower class than every body else so this particular feature is very accurate to the novel. Whereas in the 1990's version all of the boys speak in the same American accent, all of the boys are members of a military group so they are all the same standard. This feature in the film makes it unbelievable because Piggy is lower class in the novel. The result of Piggy being the same class as the other boys makes him not looked down on by the other boys which then makes the reasons for killing him only because he is still sociable. In the 1960's version, when the boys first meet on the island they are either wearing their smart school uniforms or, if they were part of the choir, their black choir robes. Their clothing at the time of Piggy's death is extremely drastic. The savage boys clothes had become ragged and they were basically naked with strips of their once existing school uniform or choir robes tied around their wastes to cover various parts. Piggy and Ralph are still seen wearing their school uniforms, but obviously with the wear and tear of surviving on a deserted island for a long period of time the clothing is in a lot worse state than when they arrived. ...read more.

Conclusion

Long shots are used to portray the dangerous surrounding the boys inhabited in and to show that something bad is bound 2 happen. In the 1990's version, Piggy is already being looked down on when he is killed. They use a low angle shot to portray that Jack is more adequate than him. The main difference between the two films is that they 1960's version is black and white and the newer 1990's version is filmed in colour. The 1960's version uses its black and white filming to their advantage because the shades of black show how dark they place can really get and how bright and happy the inhabited island can be during day time hours. This could also make the audience realise that although the film is black and white the world isn't all black and white and a lot of problems do occur. The 1990's version uses colour to indicate how lush the deserted island is, using rich blue for the sea and golden yellows for the sand. This shows how beautiful the place is. The range of colours also defines the objects better. Overall I think the two films vary in style and storylines because the older 1960s version stays very true to the story line. I think this because it wasn't long after the novel had been released and the technology to adjust the storyline to more drastic dramatic scenes was limited. Whereas the later version uses it own ideas to extend the film to their own preferences. ...read more.

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