• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Compare the way the poets present the ideas of DEATH or LOSS in 'Mid-Term Break', 'On The Train', 'On My First Sonne' and 'The Affliction of Margaret'.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

ESSAY NUMBER 3: Compare the way the poets present the ideas of DEATH or LOSS in 'Mid-Term Break', 'On The Train', 'On My First Sonne' and 'The Affliction of Margaret'. Write about: * What the deaths or losses are like * How feelings are conveyed through the poets' choice of language * The attitudes shown towards the deaths or losses * Your own response to the poems In the poems 'Mid-Term Break' by Seamus Heaney, 'On The Train' by Gillian Clarke, 'On My First Sonne' by Ben Jonson and 'The Affliction of Margaret' by William Wordsworth, all of the poets convey a loss or death, experienced by either the poet themselves, or other people too. In 'Mid-Term Break', Seamus Heaney experiences the loss of his younger brother (he is four years old: 'a four foot coffin, a foot for every year'). In 'On The Train', Gillian Clarke writes about the Paddington rail crash, on 5th October 1999 in which 31 people were killed and over 500 injured. In 'On My First Sonne', Ben Jonson writes about the death of his son, who died as a result of the plague on his 7th birthday in 1603. In 'The Affliction of Margaret' Wordsworth writes about a woman in despair because she does not know where her son is. ...read more.

Middle

Immediately in the poem, Clarke suggests the vulnerability of people on the train: 'cradled' suggests that, like a baby, you are lulled into a false sense of security and perhaps you are vulnerable. This is true: you have no control over the actions of the train, you are 'sitting duck' and are oblivious that perhaps you could die around the corner in an accident, much like Paddington Rail Crash. She also uses this to suggest that this could happen to any of us. The 'walkman' mention in lines one and two sets the time as being modern, and we immediately know that the poem is that of the recent times (aside from the fact of the poem written after the crash, and the crash was in 1999). The metaphor of: 'the black box of my walkman' not only, as mentioned above, suggests the recentness of the poem, but also likens the walkman to the 'black box' flight recorder that is found on airplanes, which records the flight data in case of an accident. This is ironic: the walkman is a 'black box' and yet there has been an accident, to which the black box is related to. ...read more.

Conclusion

The second verse tells the reader that her son has been gone for seven years and her feelings: 'despaired, believed, beguiled' all highlight how she thought he would return and how she is 'beguiled' or 'confused' as we know it. The four poems convey death and loss, or both. 'Mid-Term Break' by Seamus Heaney is about the death of Heaney's four year old brother, and the loss of the entire family. Heaney uses sombre language to set the poem in a sombre tone, and to suggest a feeling of loss and death. In 'On The Train' by Gillian Clarke, Clarke writes about The Paddington Rail Crash on 5th October 1999 and the extreme loss felt by the families of those who perished. In 'On My First Sonne', a short poem of love and grief, the author, Ben Jonson, writes about how he feels love and grief after the death of his seven year old son. In 'The Affliction of Margaret' by William Wordsworth, Wordsworth writes about a woman who does not know where her son is, and is unsure if he is dead, in a cell or dungeon, drowned in a sunken ship or lost in a desert. ?? ?? ?? ?? COMPARISON ESSAY 3 19TH OCTOBER 2004 GEORGE EDWARDS ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Seamus Heaney section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Seamus Heaney essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    Compare the poems 'Mid-Term Break' by Seamus Heaney and ' 'Out Out- ' ' ...

    4 star(s)

    The splash of vivid red contrasts with the pale skin of the child. The onomatopoeia 'pop' creates impact and focuses the attention onto the bruise. The final line is monosyllabic as this is the moment of acceptance for Heaney but also the moment where the reader discovers the full extent of the tragedy.

  2. Peer reviewed

    The three poems 'On My First Sonne', 'Mid-Term Break' and 'Refugee Mother and Child' ...

    3 star(s)

    For why". Jonson also uses a determining word which is "Farewell" in the first line of the poem which gives direction to the plot of the poem. This is a similar function to the "Counting bells knelling classes to a close" function.

  1. Comparing "Mid-term Break" and "The Early Purges".

    Innocence is also shown when the boy was "embarrassed." This shows how young the boy is like the boy in "The Early Purges". The reason he is "embarrassed" is because he is being shown respect from people older than him, where as normally he would show them respect. This gives an effect of awkwardness, and shows how awkward he must feel in this situation.

  2. In the poem 'The Affliction of Margaret', Wordsworth analyses the pain of a Mother ...

    He uses many images of darkness, which leads the reader to link this with themes of death and evil. It has a very negative effect; "Was ever darkness like to this?" This imagery analyses the Mother's fears, she is worried about his whereabouts and what might have happened to him.

  1. Study three of Heaney's poems from his first collection, including; 'Blackberry-Picking', 'Death of a ...

    There is no real peril presented by the frogs. However because the child has stolen the frog spawn, he feels guilty and imagines that nature is confronting him. We see him withdrawing from the natural world, as he �ran�, trying to escape. The boy is not only running from the monsters of his imagination, but also from the responsibility of his crime against nature.

  2. Mother - son relationship

    High cries were felled and a pure change happened.'13 Here, the poet recollects his father comforting his dying wife: 'You'll be in New Row on Monday night /And I'll come up for you and you'll be glad/ When I walk in the door...Isn't that right?'(...)He called her good and girl.'

  1. Has its own individual outlook towards death. The three poems that I am studying ...

    coffin corresponds to his age - "a four foot box, a foot for every year." The line "a four foot box, a foot for every year" is important as the alliteration makes it sand out as a stanza on its own, telling the reader in a very indirect and pathetic way that the child was only 4.

  2. A comparative study of "The Death of a naturalist" by Seamus Heaney and "The ...

    It's also like Heaney's poem where the powerful effects of nature and the uncertainty of growing up (Becoming mature). The two poems are very similar because they're both in the situation where nature is involved and not forgetting childhood.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work