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Comparing Elizabethan London to Modern Day London

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Introduction

Write an essay comparing life for a teenager in Elizabethan London with a teenager in modern day London, 21st century. In this essay I will compare Elizabethan London to modern day London and explain how life for a teenager was different in both time periods. The streets in Elizabethan times were narrow, cobbled, and slippery with the slime of refuse. Houses were crammed together, and there were a lot of furtive alleys. Chamber pots, or Jordans, were emptied out of windows and there was no drainage system. But the City had its natural cleansers--the kites, graceful birds and other various things. House designs became more balanced and symmetrical, with E and H shapes becoming more common; possibly as a tribute to Elizabeth and Henry VIII. For the first time greater attention was paid to comfort and less to defence. Battlements disappeared, arches became flattened, and bay and oriel windows grew in size. Houses were often built around an inner courtyard. The hall was still the centre of life, though now space was made in lofts for servants to sleep. The winter parlour appeared was later introduced into Elizabethan life; which was a forerunner of the modern dining room. It acted as a family retreat area, and privacy began to be more prized. ...read more.

Middle

Children in the modern day are treated more equally and so are given more freedom. But as the society has changed so has how we eat our food; in modern day London you will find fast food restaurants, supermarkets, corner shops and a lot more. In Elizabethan London you would not find anything like that. And it is the food and meals of London that has changed since the Elizabethan era that has shaped how healthy the general population are. In Elizabethan London, you would generally be a lot healthier than you would if you were to live in modern day society, as there were no fast food restaurants and there were not a lot of unhealthy foods back then. But if you were brought up in a poor family you might have not been able to afford much food, so your health would have been bad. Meals were not just part of family life in Elizabethan London; it was also part of the sports and entertainment part of life. Feasts, large, elaborately prepared meals, usually for many people and often accompanied by court entertainment. Often celebrated religious festivals, weddings, alliances and the whims of their majesties. Feasts were commonly used to commemorate the "procession" of the crowned heads of state in the summer months, when the or queen would travel through a ...read more.

Conclusion

In Elizabethan London, it was necessary for boys to attend grammar school, but girls were not allowed in any place of education. Only the wealthiest of people would have allowed their daughters to be taught at their home. Back then woman were seen as 'servants' to men as they were suppose to provide and serve meals for them and make sure their home was up to standard. So if anything, daughters were taught to be good wives in preparation for their future. The boys were taught well, if they could afford it, and they were respectable men. Now in London, every child is entitled to education so everybody can succeed in life. Elizabethan England was split into two classes; the Upper Class, the nobility, and everyone else. Punishment would vary according to class. The Upper class were well educated, wealthy and associated with Royalty and high members of the clergy. They would often become involved in Political intrigue and matters of Religion. The nobility could therefore become involved in crimes which were not shared by other people. The most common crimes of the Nobility included: high treason, blasphemy, sedition, spying, rebellion, murder, witchcraft and alchemy. In modern day London, they are a lot more crimes people can commit and be charged for and three has been an increase in the number of crimes that happen. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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