• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Comparing "Mid-term Break" and "The Early Purges".

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Comparing "Mid-term Break" and "The Early Purges" The two poems I have looked at are both wrote by Seamus Heaney, they both deal with death but in very different ways. One poem is set in the countryside and shows that death is part of the life there; the other is set in the city and shows how hard a family member dieing is. Both poems are very emotional because one poem involves kittens and the other involves a young child, they are both young and innocent. The first poem is called "The Early Purges"; the word "Purges" means to clear or sort out, this suggests the poem will be about clearing or getting rid of something. The first word of the poem is "I" from this we can tell it is a personal experience; this makes us more involved in the poem. The poet tells us about when he "first saw kittens drown" this suggests he has seen it happen a lot more since then. The first line goes straight into the theme of the poem the poet might have done this to shock the reader or to just get the poem flowing quickly, also from this line we get a real feeling of what the poem involves the death of the kittens. The word "scraggy" gives the effect of a small, not cared for kitten. ...read more.

Middle

The animals or kittens are thought of as "pests" this implies they are worthless. This sentence also shows how much he has changed "have", he understands it has to be done but when he was younger he did not. If I compare "Mid-term break" with "The Early Purges" I notice straight away that both poems have three lines per stanza except "Mid-term break," has a single line on the end Seamus Heaney might have done this so it stands out and has a greater effect on people, or so that line sticks in peoples mind. The first word in "Mid-term Break" is the same word as "The Early Purges" they both start with "I" this shows they are both personal experiences, this makes us more involved in the poem. In this first stanza there is alliteration of the letter "C" with "college", "counting", "classes", "close" and "o'clock" this slows the poem down and gives the effect of time slowly ticking away as he waits. We can tell time is going slow as the boy is "counting" the bells this gives the effect of boredom, also it implies he is trying to keep his mind off something, this makes me question why he is there. The bells are "knelling" this is a bell announcing funeral or death, it gives a sombre effect as we think someone has died. We question why his "neighbours" picked him up and drove him home. ...read more.

Conclusion

The next line reinforces again how young the child was, it gives a sad effect. On the next line we finally are told how this child died "the bumper knocked him clear" this is a fact; it shows us this was an unnatural death like the death in "The Early Purges". This gives the effect of sorrow as this boy did not die naturally, his life was taken away from him at such a young age. The last line is abrupt, it makes me think about how the young boy must was it gives a strong sad effect. This line is like the last line in "The Early Purges" as they both round the poem off and makes you think about what has happened. I think the overall effect of this poem is sadness as a young child has died. This poem is very emotional as the poet explains how everyone is dealing with the death in there own ways, there is a lot of harshness as strangers are involved it gives a uncomfortable effect it is almost intimidating. I think this second poem is more emotional than the first because the kittens in the first were killed on purpose, to the country people in had to be done but the young boy was killed by accident, it wasn't his time to leave. Charlie Longuehaye 11DA 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Seamus Heaney section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Seamus Heaney essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    Compare the poems 'Mid-Term Break' by Seamus Heaney and ' 'Out Out- ' ' ...

    4 star(s)

    This is a very powerful tool for evoking an emotional response from the reader. The boy's words frame a plea for his hand to be saved. 'Don't let them cut my hand off', 'Don't let them sister!' At this point in the poem we know more than the boy does, 'but the hand was already gone'.

  2. Coursework comparing 'Mid-term break' and 'Funeral blues'

    There are cultural differences between the poets. Seamus Heaney grew up on his father's farm, his early memories of farm life gave Heaney much to write about when he was adult. Wystan Hugh Auden was brought up with a better financial background and his work was mainly based on the

  1. the early purges

    The poem 'The Early Purges' is about how farm life may seem cruel but is purposeful. 'The early Purges', I think, is better because it is a fact and is based on events on farms. Even though 'Cat' gives a positive mood, it is quits imaginative.

  2. The Early Purges.

    "I was six when I first saw kittens drown" In the first verse, Seamus says he was six, which reminds of the children's book "Now We Are Six," by A. A. Milne. This book introduces to the world, a distinct contact to what Heaney is witnessing.

  1. I am going to analyse two poems that we have been studying, 'The Early ...

    Heaney has a good choice of adjectives with "into the bucket, a frail metal sound" because when kittens scratch on metal, it makes a frail, squeaking sound like a chair moving across the floor. 'Frail' also means the kittens are very weak; they can be killed very easily.

  2. A comparison of 'Midterm break' and 'The early purges' by Seamus Heaney

    Heaney feels uncomfortable when older men stand up to shake his hand. They say to Heaney 'sorry for my trouble', the word 'trouble' again seems insubstantial. He has to cope with strangers and whispers from the people that don't know him.

  1. The three poems I will be looking at in this essay are ''My Papa's ...

    This is how the boy's ear gets scraped on the fathers buckle. I think the father does not mean to do this I think he does love his son but he is that drunk he does not know that he is scraping his sons ear on his buckle and the dance is suppose to be an expression of this.

  2. Compare the poems 'Out-Out' and 'Mid-Term Break'

    The candles are to light the souls journey to heaven, and possibly also as a sign of hope for the family. Since the family are Catholic, they leave the body for friends and relatives to see and say their last goodbyes, and the candles would bring a sense of calm into the room, with their incandescent glow.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work