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Comparing 'Search For My Tongue' with 'IslandMan'.

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Introduction

Comparing 'Search For My Tongue' with 'Island Man' Both 'Island Man' and 'Search For my tongue' illustrate strong feelings towards the differences between Cultures. Both poets present their identities by using strong metaphors to express the way they feel. An example of this is in 'Search for my tongue', where Sujata Bhatt uses a plant to show her culture and language. Similarly In 'Island Man' Grace Nichols uses the Word "Sands" to represent English roads. Both poems are highly effective at showing the importance of peoples own cultures. Firstly in 'Search for my tongue', Bhatt uses her own language (Gujarati) in her poem. An example of this is in the quote "may thoonkay nakhi chay". By using this, Bhatt emphasises how different the English language is to her own. It also reflects how she feels about her own identity. ...read more.

Middle

This negativity, shows to the reader that learning a new culture can be a bad thing if it makes you forget your original one. Furthermore, In 'Island Man' Nichols adds a dream into the poem. This is signified when the Island Man is waking up; the poet quotes, "he always comes back". This quote makes the reader realise that he dreams about his culture and identity every night. This quote also shows a deeper meaning; that the Island Man is longing for his home. By doing this Nichols teaches the reader how important identity is to people. This is also displayed 'Search for my tongue' where Bhatt breaks up the poem with Gujarati language which is representing her dreams. It is proved that she is dreaming when Bhatt writes "but overnight as I dream". ...read more.

Conclusion

This is used to imply the poet's thoughts and feelings to the reader; it reflects feelings of uncertainty and insecurity over her culture. This contrasts greatly to 'Search for my tongue' where the structure of the poem is very orthodox. However the difference in language shows to the audience the poet's mind is split into two different parts; her identity and her current life. On the whole, both poems have affected me in similar ways. The use of the words "wild sea birds" and "fishermen" in 'Island Man' made me picture the sea. This in turn helped me realise how her thoughts were very deep and profound, just like the nature of the sea. What's more is that even though 'Search for my tongue' used a variety of different techniques, the message of the poem identical. From reading both these poems, I have learnt the importance of every one's individual identity and that remembering one's culture is vital for anyone to remain unique. ...read more.

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