• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Comparing the effect and viewpoint of Westminster Bridge and London

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Comparing the effect and viewpoint of 'Westminster Bridge' and 'London' Both 'West Minster Bridge' and 'London' in various aspects are similar and diverse. Whilst 'London' portrays the city as bleak, crowded and unhappy; 'West Minster Bridge' portrays it as peaceful and calm by comparing it to nature. An example of this is when Wordsworth states 'Never did sun more beautifully sleep,' this emphasises the beauty of the city by suggesting it is more beautiful than nature itself. Whereas Blake uses metaphorical language to imply the monarchy is responsible for the bloodshed when he says 'runs in blood down palace walls.' This will affect the reader by surprising them with a gruesome image. The juxtaposition here contrasts 'blood' and the 'palace', bloodshed implies disorder, however the palace is stereotypically authorised and ordered: Blake has combined two opposing nouns for maximum impact on the reader. ...read more.

Middle

Such as the word 'cry' - embedding a sense of sorrow throughout the stanza. The word 'cry' can be interpreted in two different ways, either meaning that the person is crying out for help, or crying as a result of despair and sadness. The stereotype of a child is someone of innocence and purity - therefore unafraid. A stereotypical man is tough and masculine - so unlikely to cry. However, despite these conventions, William Blake has subverted the language of the poem to create a juxtaposition by contrasting the crying man and the scared child. Contrasting with these emotions brought across in 'London', is the sense of joy given by words such as 'beauty', 'glittering', 'splendour', 'calm' and 'still' used in 'West Minster Bridge'. ...read more.

Conclusion

The overall rhythm is strict and controlled - reflecting the message brought across about the corruption of London. This, as opposed to the smooth and free rhythm in West Minister Bridge, which alternatively slows down throughout the poem, until finally coming to a complete halt. This final halt is emphasised by the exclamation mark, an exclamation mark gives impact and dictates an air of something exciting and enjoyable. 'London' is the dominant poem in my opinion. The repetition, trudging rhythm and juxtapositions in the poem contribute to the effectiveness. An example of this is the last line, when Blake says 'marriage hearse'. This emphasises Blake's idea of a marriage corrupt with disease, linking it back to the word 'plague' mentioned just before. 'West Minister Bridge' however, is not nearly as strict - providing more appealing images, however leaving the poem far less effective. By Liam Naybour ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Pre and Post 1914 Comparison section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Pre and Post 1914 Comparison essays

  1. Compare Wordsworths view of London in Composed Upon Westminster Bridge with that of Blake ...

    Many including Blake, saw this as robbing ordinary people of their rights and freedom. Also Blake makes the audience imagine a dark chartered city with poor and suffering people. He creates a dark, angry and violent image with words such as; 'hearse, fear, blood, cry, plagues, and blights.'

  2. Comparison of The Daffodils(TM) by William Wordsworth and Miracle on St David(TM)s Day(TM) by ...

    this extends the idea that they are in the background and are subtle, so as not to take the attention from the man and his sudden inspiration. In the next verse, the poet explains the history of the labourer and tells us where and when he learnt the poem, 'Forty

  1. Compare the viewpoint on war in Charge of the Light Brigade by Alfred ...

    We compared Dulce Et Decorum Est. to the charge of the light brigade written on the Crimean war by Alfred Lord Tennyson unlike Owen, Tennyson didn't 'Dulce Et Decorum Est.' is set during the 1st world war. In this poem, Owen focuses on the part of the war when the

  2. Compare and contrast the poems upon Westminster bridge, by William Wordsworth and London by ...

    'London' is written in four regular quatrains with an alternating ABAB rhyming pattern (e.g. chartered street...face I meet). The rhyming pattern remains the same throughout the poem making it repetitive. Blake does this do illustrate the monotonousness of life in London.

  1. A Comparisson Between Composed Upon Westminster Bridge by William Wordsworth and London by William ...

    I found the poem sad and sympathized with the boy until I found out he knew more than he was letting on. I understand why he didn't tell the troops because they probably would have killed him and his father anyway, had he confessed.

  2. Compare and Contrast the two poems London and Composed Upon Westminster Bridge

    He wants to capture the moment - 'the beauty of the morning', which London wears like a 'garment'. By using the word 'garment', Blake has acknowledged that he is looking at the clothing of London, not its body.

  1. Compare the different presentations of London that are found in the poetry of Wordsworth ...

    What is described from the buildings being 'open unto the fields, and to the sky' in line seven is symbolic of a city being open and free, inviting people to follow. However, this could be a metaphorical description, as is the remaining few lines of the octave and the entire sestet.

  2. Both The Moment by Margaret Atwood and London by William Blake are poems about ...

    He uses an alternate line rhyme and a strong iambic pentameter comes through in ?in every cry of every man, in every infant?s cry of fear.? This strong metre creates a relentless pace, and conveys an idea of confinement and being trapped, due to the set form, mirroring the ?chartered?

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work