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Comparing the effect and viewpoint of Westminster Bridge and London

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Introduction

Comparing the effect and viewpoint of 'Westminster Bridge' and 'London' Both 'West Minster Bridge' and 'London' in various aspects are similar and diverse. Whilst 'London' portrays the city as bleak, crowded and unhappy; 'West Minster Bridge' portrays it as peaceful and calm by comparing it to nature. An example of this is when Wordsworth states 'Never did sun more beautifully sleep,' this emphasises the beauty of the city by suggesting it is more beautiful than nature itself. Whereas Blake uses metaphorical language to imply the monarchy is responsible for the bloodshed when he says 'runs in blood down palace walls.' This will affect the reader by surprising them with a gruesome image. The juxtaposition here contrasts 'blood' and the 'palace', bloodshed implies disorder, however the palace is stereotypically authorised and ordered: Blake has combined two opposing nouns for maximum impact on the reader. ...read more.

Middle

Such as the word 'cry' - embedding a sense of sorrow throughout the stanza. The word 'cry' can be interpreted in two different ways, either meaning that the person is crying out for help, or crying as a result of despair and sadness. The stereotype of a child is someone of innocence and purity - therefore unafraid. A stereotypical man is tough and masculine - so unlikely to cry. However, despite these conventions, William Blake has subverted the language of the poem to create a juxtaposition by contrasting the crying man and the scared child. Contrasting with these emotions brought across in 'London', is the sense of joy given by words such as 'beauty', 'glittering', 'splendour', 'calm' and 'still' used in 'West Minster Bridge'. ...read more.

Conclusion

The overall rhythm is strict and controlled - reflecting the message brought across about the corruption of London. This, as opposed to the smooth and free rhythm in West Minister Bridge, which alternatively slows down throughout the poem, until finally coming to a complete halt. This final halt is emphasised by the exclamation mark, an exclamation mark gives impact and dictates an air of something exciting and enjoyable. 'London' is the dominant poem in my opinion. The repetition, trudging rhythm and juxtapositions in the poem contribute to the effectiveness. An example of this is the last line, when Blake says 'marriage hearse'. This emphasises Blake's idea of a marriage corrupt with disease, linking it back to the word 'plague' mentioned just before. 'West Minister Bridge' however, is not nearly as strict - providing more appealing images, however leaving the poem far less effective. By Liam Naybour ...read more.

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