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Comparing Wordsworth and Keats' Romantic Poetry.

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Introduction

Comparing Wordsworth and Keats' Romantic Poetry. Both Wordsworth and Keats are romantic Poets, they express ideas on nature and send us the message to respect it. They say we have to admire the beauty of nature in different ways. Wordsworh uses simpler language in his poems wether to express simple or complex ideas, by which we understand he aimed his poems to lower classes. Keats instead, uses much more complex language to describe and express his ideas, so we know he aimed his poems to the educated. During the romnatic period, poets would mainly send out the message to admire nature and see the beauty in it. We should fine joy in nature and nature should be our teacher. In the poem "composed upon Westminster Bridge" Wordsworth makes us all want to see the beauty he saw that morning looking down on the quiet city: " the beauty of the morning silent, bare...". Meanwhile Keats in "on the sea" compares the city to the countryside. Both these poems are Sonnets and in iambic pentameter so a regular rhythm is created throughout both poems. ...read more.

Middle

Keats also mentions Hecete who is an evil character that witches used to pray to. Here we see his poems were difinitely aimed to a higher educated class, because a poor and uneducated person couldn't've understood references to sea nymphs or Hecete. In "Daffodils" Wordsworth gives a romantic and sentimental tone all the way though. It is a happy poem and it gives out a positive message; to celebrate nature. Its tone is also personal and informal, which we know because Wordsworth uses often the word "I" as it to mean "me talking to you". Comparing "daffodils" to "To Autumn" we see that in the second one Keats uses descriptive language and detail, and it's all positive to emphasise the same message as Wordsworth; to celebrate nature. In "To Autumn" the tone is less personal and the vocabulary much more formal, because aimed to more educated people, to a higher social level. In "To Autumn" Keats gives the poem a slower tone, or pace through long eight sillable long lines, and the poem is composed of three verses of eleven lines each. ...read more.

Conclusion

The last line is completely different to the whole verse "Simmer has o'er-brimmed their clammy cells" here he uses the sound "M" throughout the line. The "S" is repeated for a different effect in "On the sea". Wrodsworth has a rhyming scheme of "ABABCC" to make the sound more flowing. Keats instead has a more complex, furher apart rhyming scheme of "ABABCDEDECE". The main message of the poem "To Autumn" is that autumn is rich, and it is sent out ina more formal way then "Daffodils" where the message id more personal because it is Wordsworth's feelings and he sends them straight to you by using often the word "I" and giving it an endering informality. Both poets send out a similar message in all theur poems for they both wrote in the romantic period and they both believed that nature was more powerful than man, thet we all had to respect it and celebrate the beauty it had created on earth. Perhaps it was his informality and personal approach, and his simpler language, which made Wordsworth mroe popular than Keats. ...read more.

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