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Comparison Essay Between Pride and Prejudice and An Inspector Calls

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Comparison Essay Between Pride and Prejudice and An Inspector Calls Pride and Prejudice and An Inspector Calls are different texts but have many similarities. One aspect that makes them different is that they are both set in different times. Pride and Prejudice is set in the 18th century while An Inspector Calls is set in the 20th century. They also have similarities, one of them being that class is a prime issue in both stories. Class first becomes apparent in Pride and Prejudice straight away. At the dance Mr Darcy and Mr Bingley are there with friends and family. Jane Austen shows us that Mr Darcy is very narrow minded about class. At the dance the writer shows us that Mr Darcy only talks and dances with the people of the same class as him. (Page 11) "He was the proudest most disagreeable man in the world, everybody hoped he would never come there again." Jane Austen is showing us showing us about Mr Darcy and his attitudes to class. The writer is showing us that class was around then by using a proud rich man that is foul and bad company. (Page 11) "She is tolerable, but not handsome enough to tempt me." The writer shows that he thinks he is to good for Elizabeth. ...read more.


(Page272) "I was told that not only your sister was on the point of being most advantageously married, but that you, that Miss Elizabeth Bennet, would, in all likelihood, soon afterwards you would be united to my nephew-my own nephew-Mr Darcy." The writer shows us that Lady Catherine is being very prejudice towards Lizzy getting married to Darcy. The writer does this firstly, with one word 'advantageously' given a chance for Jane to get married to Mr Bingley. The writer used this word to put Jane down by making it 'a chance' that they should get married. Jane Austen also repeats 'to my nephew'. Jane Austen repeats this word to make it sound like a lower class heathen is getting married 'to her' higher class gentlemen. (Page274) "They are descended, on the maternal side, from the same noble line; and, on the fathers, from respectable, honourable, and ancient, though untitled families. Their fortune on both sides is splendid. They are destined for each other by the voice of every member of their respective houses, and what is to divide them? The upstart pretensions of a young woman without family, connections or fortune." Once again class is a feature. The writer does this by several different things. The first, is that Lady Catherine lists all the things Lizzy has not got, honour, respect, connections or a large fortune. ...read more.


This is the same as what happens in Pride and Prejudice. Lady Catherine tells Elizabeth that she is rich, powerful etc and that Elizabeth should respect her, just like what Mr Birling did to the Inspector, But in both stories Elizabeth and the Inspector treat them with less dignity and respect. I think the writers do this to show that if you don't treat people with respect then you will not be treated with respect either, no matter how rich you are. I think the moral here is " Treat people with the same respect as you would like to be given" (Page12) "Perhaps I ought to explain first that this is Mr Gerald Croft - the son of Sir George Croft - you know Crofts Limited." Mr Birling points out that this is Mr Gerald Croft. The writer shows us this because he wants the Inspector to leave him alone, so by telling him about their businesses he might go. You can see that class is slightly different in both stories. In Pride and Prejudice the writer shows us that she makes class more apparent by characters themselves telling people how upper class they are. In An Inspector Calls the writer shows us that the characters tell people what they have got and who they know in connection to how upper class they are, where as in An Inspector Calls they still do it but to less of an extent. ...read more.

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