• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Comparison of Elizabeth Bennet's Marriage Proposals in Pride and Prejudice

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Pride and Prejudice Through the course of the novel, Elizabeth Bennet receives two very different marriage proposals, and a declaration of love. In chapter 19 Mr. Collins proposes to Elizabeth in his long-winded and pretentious manner, and in chapter 34 Mr. Darcy makes his own conflicting proposal of marriage. In chapter 58 Darcy asserts his love for Elizabeth despite her previous rejection of him. From the way each man makes his proposal we learn a great deal about their characters, and we see Elizabeth's own character reflected in her reaction to each. Even by chapter 19, the reader has been drawn in to such an extent by these characters that we empathise with them greatly, especially Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy. The reader identifies particularly with Elizabeth, the protagonist. At the beginning of the novel, long before Collins' proposal, we have grown to dislike him. When Collins proposes to Elizabeth, the reader knows that he will not be successful. We have a distaste for Collins after we are told he first wanted to marry Jane, but then turned to Elizabeth when he discovered Jane's relationship with Bingley. We know he had no affection or attraction to either, so we hope that his efforts towards Elizabeth fail. Before proposing, he effectively asks for permission by informing Mrs. Bennet of his intentions. ...read more.

Middle

Darcy appears greatly agitated when he made his proposal. He enters her room and walks about for a while before speaking, even then to make a few awkward enquiries after Elizabeth's health. He was fervently in love with Elizabeth and speaks briefly and passionately. "In vain I have struggled. It will not do. My feelings are not to be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you." This outburst is in sharp contrast to Collin's long pre-planned monologue, and shows true emotion instead of false sentiments of affection. But Darcy is also strikingly similar to Collins' in his arrogant presumption that she will accept him, "he spoke of apprehension and anxiety, but his countenance expressed real security". His utter bewilderment that she should refuse him "...no less resentment than surprise. His complexion became pale with anger, and the disturbance of his mind was visible in every feature." This demonstrates the same sort of conceit that Collins displayed. Darcy then goes on to insult her Elizabeth's family and circumstances. "Could you expect me to rejoice in the inferiority of your connections?" His insensitivity to Elizabeth is clear - he describes his feeling for Elizabeth as against his better judgement, "his sense of her inferiority - of it's being a degradation - of the family obstacles which judgment had always opposed to inclination." Again he shows himself to be proud, snobbish and superior, like Collins. ...read more.

Conclusion

She is also pleasantly surprised by Darcy's civility during her visit to Pemberley, and this too affects a change in her emotions. Each of them has helped the other become a better person; we feel the two are 'right' for each other. We feel confident that they will be contented together in married life and grow in mutual love and respect. After the correction of Elizabeth and Darcy's faults, the two have earned each other. They deserve a happy married life based on mutual devotion and financial security, with which Austen rewards them. I feel that Elizabeth was right to reject Collins - his focus on the financial and practical side of marriage was the antithesis to Elizabeth's ideal of love in married life. The marriage would not have been happy for either. I also feel that Elizabeth was right to reject Darcy's proposal of marriage. At that time, neither had had the opportunity to change in response to each other's criticisms, and as Elizabeth would have accepted his offer of marriage without truly being in love, we, the reader, would lose respect for her, as would Darcy, and it would appear her interest is fiscal rather than romantic. It would also be an unhappy marriage. I feel that Elizabeth was right to agree to marriage in the end. She had overcome her prejudice, and Darcy his pride, and we know that they are a good match for each other. We hope that they will have a secure and happy married life. ?? ?? ?? ?? - 1 - ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Jane Austen section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Jane Austen essays

  1. A Comparison of the Prejudice which the Heroines Suffer in Rebecca and Pride and ...

    Charlotte is sympathetic to Elizabeth's situation with the insufferable Mr.Collins- Elizabeth 'owed her greatest relief' to her. The personalities of the heroines in Rebecca and Pride and Prejuice differ considerably and therefore they respond in different ways to the prejudices they suffer.

  2. Jane Austen's View on the Social Class and How It Affects Elizabeth and Darcy's ...

    Only herself and Bingley's sisters who would object her. Luckily, both Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth are strong enough not to be influenced by Lady Catherine. Later in the novel, the audiences learn that Mr. Darcy's altered manner at Pemberly results from his intention to prove to Elizabeth that he is not an arrogant and cold-hearted man.

  1. How do pride and Prejudice affect the relationship between Darcy and Elizabeth - Compare ...

    Collins, as Jane Austen did not want you to sympathise with him. Mr. Collins comes across as a very pompous, selfish, and uncaring man throughout the whole book, I do not think Austen wanted us to like him. Elizabeth is angry at Darcy when he proposes to her, it is

  2. Pride and Prejudice essay - a comparison of Elizabeth and Lydia

    Lydia though does not, as far as I can tell, show much talent or interest in the areas of music and arts. She seems rather preoccupied with the soldiers in neighbouring Meryton, clothes, balls and gossip. Although Elizabeth is generally well liked and highly thought of, she does not completely live up to expectations in her society.

  1. "Pride and Prejudice" Elizabeth's visit to Pemberley.

    He is very welcoming and friendly towards them considering the comments he made of Elizabeth's family in his proposal of marriage and he invites Elizabeth's uncle to go fishing with him.

  2. Pride and prejudice- how do pride and prejudice affects the relationship between Darcy & ...

    and married to a man with a lot of money, they can expect and afford to sit at home and do practically nothing whereas if it was the opposite and earning only sixty pounds a year you are more likely to become a maid and work hard.

  1. Portrayal of Marriage in Pride and Prejudice.

    When prejudice does occur in this novel, Jane Austen has shown it in the hands of a notoriously proud character. Because prejudice is not personified (ie. depicted as a major characteristic flaw) I believe that it was not to be the object of Jane Austen's sharper criticism.

  2. Examine the different marriage relationships and attitudes towards marriage presented in 'Pride and Prejudice'. ...

    She has a superficial attitude to all people. She does not relate to anyone in their society and Jane Austen sees this as trivial like to emphasis her particular characteristic; criticism. For instance she criticizes Miss King's appearance, "such a nasty little freckled thing" and sticks-up for Mr Wickham "Wickham is safe......she is a great fool for going away".

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work