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Comparison of Jane Eyre + The Color Purple.

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Introduction

Comparison of Jane Eyre + The Color Purple Both novels are variations of the same theme: the spiritual and emotional growth of the heroine. Is this a fair assessment? Both novels convey important, political messages exploring the idea of feminism and women�s emancipation. Bronte uses Jane as a figure of female independence, while Walker demonstrates her views on civil rights and commitment to feminism through Celie. In this essay I will be examining the traumatic journeys that both Jane and Celie go through, to find their eventual happiness. I will also be considering the spiritual and emotional growth of both girls, throughout their journey in life. Written in 1847, Jane Eyre was an immediate best seller in the early Victorian period. At this period in time, women had a very inferior status to men, which allowed Bronte to stress her theme of female independence. Jane is the eponymous heroine of the novel, going through severe tests in each stage of her life, so that she can eventually deserve her eventual happiness. Jane starts her journey with her childhood at Gateshead. Here, we quickly discover that Jane is unhappy and it is evident by the way she hides behind the thick red curtains in the deserted room, that she is lonely and isolated. ...read more.

Middle

She has been left a fortune and after insisting the fortune should be split between all four of them explains, �it could never be mine in justice, though it might be mine in law�. The refusal to accept the full sum also highlights the aspect of her character which values love, friendship and decency above finance and its trappings. After several months pass, Jane is faced with yet another important decision, the marriage proposal from a man whom she shares no true love with. She rejects the idea of being �forced to keep the fire of my nature continually low, to compel it to burn inwardly and never utter a cry, though the imprisoned flame consumed vital after vital (organ)�. This shows the horrors she feels at the prospect of a loveless marriage; again her moral views are very important. Jane and Rochester have an unbreakable heart and the calling suggests the idea of a spiritual communication. Jane's difficult decision concludes the novel, as she is faced with returning to where she left her broken heart. It is important to note that at the end of the novel, that Jane has improved her position. Compared to her inferior status at the beginning of her life at Thornfield, when Jane returns to the blind Mr Rochester, she can no longer be seen as equal, but as the dominant character. ...read more.

Conclusion

From the beginning of the novel, Jane was strong-willed and independent. Celie displayed the characteristics of an animal. She continually receives beatings, and therefore expects continual beatings. Celie relies on other people to help her through the world, and to help her gain confidence and independence. Jane was able to do this herself. This leads me to conclude that I feel Jane does not grow much more from her original independent self, but instead keeps to her moral and religious faiths and eventually is rewarded everything she deserves. In contrast, Celie grows from a timid, animal-like character to the determined, content, pants making woman she becomes. Both girls though, show the spirit that was needed in every woman to overcome a world of inequality. Both Jane and Celie show the spiritual and emotional strength, to face the condemnation you black, you pore, you ugly, and most of all you a women." This is a comparison to the male dominated society that both the characters live in. This is represented in both texts. In 'Oranges are not the only Fruit' There is no dominant male role model for 'Janine' instead she has in her society many male characters who she cannot relate to such as 'Pastor Finch' and 'Pastor Spratt' ...read more.

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