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Comparison of 'We are Seven' by William Wordsworth and 'Mid-Term Break' by Seamus Heaney.

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Introduction

Comparison of 'We are Seven' by William Wordsworth and 'Mid-Term Break' by Seamus Heaney. William Wordsworth was a defining member of the English Romantic Movement. As we can see from reading his poem, his personality and love of nature is conveyed. Wordsworth was probably inspired from his upbringing and most of his mature life living in the Lake District with picturesque landscapes influencing a true love of nature. Some describe Wordsworth as a profoundly earnest and sincere thinker who displays a high seriousness tempered with tenderness and a love of simplicity. Seamus Heaney had a rather conflicting upbringing as he also grew up in the country- watching American soldiers in the local fields around 1944. Heaney has taken this image of himself as a consciousness suspended between history and ignorance as representative of the nature of his poetic life and development. ...read more.

Middle

Similarly, We are Seven is about a young girl who is convincing the reader that her family consists of seven although a few of them are dead. Death links these two poems together along with the sorrow and mixed emotions of losing a loved one who was very close to you in each case a brother and also sisters. It is a genuinely moving piece which is a realisation of the reality of situations happening in the world today - recently the tsunami tragedy in Southern Asia and the 'War Against Terror.' The last line emphasises the fact that when someone does die they are not missing from a persons thoughts and feeling. Mid-Term Break is set out in 7 verses which each contain equally 3 lines. ...read more.

Conclusion

On the other hand, We are Seven is written with a beat and rhyme adding to the purpose of the poem, we can see that when someone is trying to convince, they have a certain beat about their voice which is portrayed in the poem clearly. It is a sort of dialogue between the girl and the reader, which is an effect well used by Wordsworth to involve the reader. The first thoughts you get when you read the title of Mid-Term Break are of young innocent school children playing and having their whole life ahead of them but the happiness fades away after the first few lines as we become aware of the situation. We are Seven can portray a family bond or a friendship in many ways. In conclusion, I can say that the two poems link in many ways and are very skillfully written in the way they give impact onto the reader. ...read more.

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