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Consider how Act 1 of Romeo and Juliet sets up what will happen to the star crossed lovers

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Introduction

Consider how Act 1 of Romeo and Juliet sets up what will happen to the "star crossed lovers" The story of Romeo and Juliet is an inevitable tragedy. Many events take place, which are quite adverse to the love Romeo and Juliet have for one another. By mentioning marriage and death together Shakespeare foreshadows Romeo and Juliet's tragic ending. From the very beginning of the play throughout and to the end there has always been the intent of a tragedy; Shakespeare uses much dramatic irony to express this. Shakespeare also cleverly introduces the juxtaposition of life love and death into the play from the very beginning in the prologue. The prologue is a brief summary of the play written in sonnet form with rhyming couples, this is also written in iambic pentameter. This sets up what will happen to Romeo and Juliet as the quote "With their death bury their parents' strife," tells the audience. This also symbolises the burial of emotions besides the burial of love. Shakespeare begins with a prologue that tells the audience of the tragic ending of Romeo and Juliet and their description as a "pair of star crossed lovers." ...read more.

Middle

We see examples of his characters actions through his language in the play. When Romeo first meets Juliet at the Capulet's ball he immediately forgets about Rosaline and says "O she doth teach the torches to burn bright! I seems... till this night" Here he communicates his love for Juliet by comparing her to all things light. His language also changes from prose to iambic pentameter. His speeches have also become more eloquent and extravagant as he uses copious imagery metaphors and similes in his sentences. An example of his rash actions would be after Capulet's ball he sneaks into Juliet's balcony just so he can see her. But it did not occur to him once that if he had been caught in his enemies' house Tybalt would have killed him. This suggests that his decisions are rash and he doesn't think of the consequences. Likewise, Juliet's fatal flaw is impetuousness, her character is frivolous childish and eager because her character was only meant to be about 14 in the play. We see this in the play during the balcony scene; Juliet hurries Romeo into marriage. She constantly questions his love for her and rushes him into marriage with the quote "If...thy purpose marriage, send me word tomorrow," Secondly, like Romeo, she kills herself over what could be just infatuation. ...read more.

Conclusion

By making this choice he sets up all the problems that occur later. Although this isn't all the consequences of Romeos actions. Juliet's decision also plays a large part in deciding their end. Juliet character immature and inconsiderate; she doesn't consider the consequences of her actions; Shakespeare uses colour symbolism and binary oppositions to show Juliet's change. When Juliet chooses to drink the potion and not leave Verona for Romeo she makes a leeway for chance and fate to come into the play. She didn't think about the consequences of her plan and action through thoroughly which is why she suffered for it. Many elements of chance or fate and choice together decided the outcome of this story these star-crossed lovers. Romeo and Juliet were responsible for their own physical deaths but it was fate that cornered and limited their decisions. I think that If Romeo and Juliet's personalities were not so impulsive and spontaneous they might have lived. Shakespeare gives the audience a little hope that they will survive together but each time their hopes are squashed. Even though Romeo and Juliet didn't have to kill themselves it was already "written in the stars" which is why I think that fate is the most dominant factor in the play contributing to their tragic but inevitable ending. ...read more.

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