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Consider how Arthur Miller makes Act 3 of 'The Crucible' so dramatic.

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Introduction

Consider how Arthur Miller makes Act 3 Of `The Crucible' so dramatic The year of 1692 was a defining moment in old American history, this was because of the Salem witch-hunt in Massachusetts. The play, `The Crucible' was written by Arthur Miller in 1953 and was published later that year. Miller is a famous playwright, born in New York City in 1915, his other works include `Death of a Salesman' and `A View from the Bridge'. Having been written in the 1950's, `The Crucible' corresponded with the mass-hysteria that was occurring throughout America at the time. This hysteria was being brought about by a communist witch-hunt led by the US senator, Joseph McCarthy. This was a `hunt' in which American inhabitants were being put on trial, having been accused of communism or sympathising with those who were. This brief era was later, aptly named McCarthyism due to the senator's key role in the hunt. This incident closely relates to `The Crucible' with the witch-hunt being fuelled by madness and fear. Another similar incident to that of McCarthyism is that of the `War on Terrorism'. This `war' has been brought about by leading government figures' false opinions, being stimulated by their personal fear leading to mass-hysteria within millions of people. ...read more.

Middle

Cheever thinks this is due to the poppet and Elizabeth has been using the doll as some kind of voodoo over Abigail. This was thought of as witchcraft, consequently Elizabeth was arrested on suspicion of witchcraft and the scene ends on a moment of high-intensity with Proctor forcefully ordering Mary Warren to testify in court over the poppet and to tell the truth. Now, on to act 3, my chosen scene to study. Act 3 begins with voices and no-one `on stage' and Giles Corey being thrown out of the courthouse, where his wife, Martha is being tried to being a witch. "I am innocent to a witch. I know not what a witch is." This is followed by Judge Hathorne's question "How do you know then, that you are not a witch?" The question posed is interesting because it is asking that if she isn't a witch, how she know that, for certain. This question builds up tension with how Martha is to respond, she responds, "If I were, I would know it". The argument between both Martha and Hathorne is interrupted by Giles; the interruption comes at a vital point in the argument, "I have evidence for the court!" ...read more.

Conclusion

The pace of this part of the scene is hysterical, all characters have been come over with extreme emotion and people seem to say what they please. But, knowing Arthur Miller, this is not the end of the scene. It ends on the slight cliff-hanger of John Proctor being arrested and the Reverend John Hale quitting the court. Miller has used such a technique that makes the scene so dramatic that you feel you have to read on. In my opinion, Arthur Miller goes beyond what is needed to make `The Crucible' a very entertaining and dramatic play. Miller has made sure that there is something interesting for everyone to observe and read. By setting the play in 1692, with the communism and anxiety, it is easy to relate the story to modern day events. Although, looking at the story two-dimensionally portrays the events in Salem itself, whereas, looking at it 3-dimensionally will make you aware that Miller has purposely used events that he feels would plague the modern era but in a historical context. All in all, the drama in the play and with human emotions, anxiety, fear and other characteristics thrown into the melting pot that is `The Crucible', it makes out for a fascinating tale of how human emotions and thoughts can get the better of others. ...read more.

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