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Consider how Emily Bront introduces the reader to the themes of enclosure and the supernatural in the opening three chapters of Wuthering Heights

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Introduction

Consider how Emily Bront� introduces the reader to the themes of enclosure and the supernatural in the opening three chapters of Wuthering Heights. Wuthering Heights is a novel which criticisers the idea of enclosure in pre 19th century books and life. It was published in December 1847, but only 250 copies were published. It centres on pivotal characters, which Emily Bront� heavily describes. People who read the book from the contemporary audience would have been shocked from the language and all the swearing, they thought it was a depressing and morose novel. Emily Bront� was born in Thornton, Yorkshire, in the north of England; similarly the book is set in the north of Yorkshire, in the moors. This amplifies the idea enclosure already as it is a hard to reach place, and the place where it is set, is remote to every where else! Emily had a rough life because she lived in a small stone cottage on the 2nd floor with three bedrooms, no bigger than a small closet. She died of Tuberculosis in late 1848. She caught a cold at her brother, Branwell's, funeral in September. ...read more.

Middle

Lockwood also asks himself questions like "Why did I think of Linton?" on page 17, this leads on to impression of enclosure like "Situation so completely removed from the stir of society" and "Misanthropists heaven", this means someone who hates society and everyone else. This is ideal for an misanthropist because no one else is around and the nearest house is about 2 miles away. Another sense of a misanthropist is when Heathcliff says "Walk in" and when the dogs attack Lockwood because they are not use to anyone else. Nobody helps Lockwood when he shouts accept for Zillah, this is because women were cheap labour and disrespected back then. This leads to a description of Wuthering Heights it shows an influence of a gothic novel because of the different features like "quantity of grotesque carving lavished over the front", this is on page 2 and he says there is "Crumberling griffins and shameless little boys" over the door, so the book reinforces the idea of supernatural. When it says "dark skinned gypsy" people thought they were into aroused suspicion. Another part of the supernatural is when Lockwood says "The storm subsided magically". ...read more.

Conclusion

At the beginning Lockwood seems more provoked as he thinks himself to be in the same league as Heathcliff, towards the end he is shown to be quite different from Heathcliff; further more we would feel sympathetic towards him as he was callously attacked by Heathcliffs' dogs. Having been annoyed by this racket, Heathcliff is angry and unsympathetic towards him. Moving on, Emily Bront� builds up the idea of the supernatural and enclosure, through a number of ways. Firstly we see Lockwood, anonymously, returning to Wuthering Heights, to have, yet another meeting with Heathcliff. "Yesterday afternoon set in misty and cold. I had half a mind to spend by my study fire, instead if wading through heath and mud to Wuthering Heights." This shows that Lockwood is optimistic to still show Heathcliff he can be a nicer person than normal. Furthermore, after re entering Wuthering Heights, Lockwood is bombarded by displeasure and hints of hatred, towards him, as Heathcliff does not want a repeat of what happened before, "You should not have come out." This would make the audience feel slight sympathy towards Lockwood, but as he unconventionally turned up, it was not wrong for Heathcliff and the others to feel this way. ...read more.

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