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Consider how J.B Priestley combines dramatic effectiveness with political comment in 'An Inspector Calls.'

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Introduction

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Middle

Birling seems a very confident man. But the audiences confidence in him is shattered by the false views and statements he proclaims. For example "The Titanic is unsinkable, absolutely unsinkable" and also "The Germans don't want war." Birling announces these things so solemnly and he really believes in himself. But as we now know, there were two great world wars against Germany resulting in global chaos and that the Titanic sank on her maiden voyage, thus proving Birling wrong. Priestley purposefully gave Birling these misguided views to show that his opinions are all wrong and also suggests that he is rather pompous, selfish and somewhat of a fool. Suspense and dramatic irony feature greatly in the play. Suspense is effectively used to keep the audience engaged and entertained whilst dramatic irony is used to show the characters just how ignorant they are to their situations and involvements surrounding the death. Mrs Birling is a prime example of this if I refer to the end of act two. The audience are led to conclude that Eric is the father of the unborn baby through the inspectors intense process of elimination of the suspects. Shelia eventually figures it out but Mrs Birling is adamant in blaming the young man responsible for the troubles he has caused Eva, and the Birling family. ...read more.

Conclusion

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