• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Consider how Jane Austen presents the character of Mr Collins in the first twenty chapters of Pride and Prejudice.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

English Coursework. Consider how Jane Austen presents the character of Mr Collins in the first twenty chapters of Pride and Prejudice. Jane Austen presents Mr Collins as a character with many different traits. Mr Collins is a man who is very aware of his social status, likes to impress people, is extremely proud and has an inflated ego to name but a few. The first time we get a mention of Mr Collins, is in chapter thirteen, where we learn that Mr Bennet has in fact never met the man who will inherit the house upon Mr Bennet's death. We learn this from Mr Bennet, and the way he says, "``it is a person whom I never saw in the whole course of my life.''" This suggests that Mr Collins' arrival will be one of great surprise and unexpected. Also, it gives a hint of suspicion, as Mr Collins is Mr Bennet's cousin and yet they have never met before, so why has he suddenly decided to write now? However, the first time we see the character of Mr Collins, is when Mr Bennet reads out his letter. In the first sentence, Mr Collins says: "The disagreement subsisting between yourself and my late honourable father, always gave me much uneasiness" I feel that here Mr Collins is trying to sweeten the family up, so that he could in turn receive something for trying to heal the rift between the two families. ...read more.

Middle

He also talks about Lady Catherine, saying "she had always spoken to him as she would to any other gentleman; she made not the smallest objection to his joining in the society of the neighbourhood, nor to his leaving of the parish occasionally for a week or two, to visit his relations." Here, he is making out that Lady Catherine is so wonderful that she lets him do all this stuff, when in fact he is entitled to do it in the first place. He doesn't need her permission, yet says she gives him permission. Here he shows his lack of independence, showing that he allows himself to be influenced by her wealth and social status. We also see that Mr Collins is not spontaneous, but in fact a person who amuses himself by previously thinking about compliments. He admits this to Mr Bennet, "I sometimes amuse myself with suggesting and arranging such little elegant compliments as may be adapted to ordinary occasions, I always wish to give them as unstudied air as possible." The way Mr Collins is portrayed here shows him to be a man that likes to impress people, trying to find a way to befriend people by bombarding them with compliments and by talking about how wonderful they are to his friends. He uses this to secure his own advantage. When Mr Collins proposes to Elizabeth, he yet again shows he will use flattery to get what he wants, as he says "adds to your perfections" and "natural delicacy". ...read more.

Conclusion

Also, he thinks that even though Elizabeth has only met him, that she has already fallen madly in love with him. In chapter twenty, Mr Collins enters the breakfast-room and talks to Mrs Bennet about the refusal of marriage. When he is talking to her, he says "we are all liable to error. I have certainly meant well through the whole affair. My object has been to secure an amiable companion for myself, with due consideration for the advantage of all your family, and if my manner has been at all reprehensible, I here beg leave to apologise." Here, he is trying to make Mrs Bennet believe that her daughter is in the wrong for turning down Mr Collins, than Mr Collins proposing so early. Also, he is trying to make out that he does not care that Elizabeth has turned him down and that all he wanted out of his proposal was a companion and that he can find someone else to replace her. He is horrified to think that he has been turned down by someone in their situation and can not believe it. Overall, Mr Collins is a man who is so wrapped up in himself that he cannot see how inflated his ego is. He also thinks that he is above everyone else both socially and personally. Mr Collins is also arrogant as he expected Elizabeth to accept his marriage proposal and he is also striving to impress as he tries to sweet talk everyone by paying them compliments. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Jane Austen section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Jane Austen essays

  1. Commentary on "Mr, Collins's proposal" from Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austin

    Though her answer is based on her lack of interest in Mr. Collins, she knows that they wouldn't suit each other as they are people of different priorities. Mr. Collins can't comprehend that as a reason to not get married, as he believes if he will be happy, then the marriage should commence.

  2. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

    spirituality this is shown by the way he exhibits himself to the other characters for example in his proposal to Elizabeth . A patron such as Lady Catherine de Bourgh was someone who presented a clergy man to his benefice for example a rectory, vicarage or a perpetual curacy 'she

  1. How effective are the opening chapters of Pride and Prejudice

    As time goes on, Elizabeth cumulatively takes less part in the silly conversations between her mother and sisters. We see how she thrives on lively conversation between herself and Mr Darcy, which inevitably draws her feelings towards him.

  2. How does Austen use the character of Mr Collins?

    Collins is a fully representative of the stereotypical man of fortune given by the narrator. Not that he is a man of an old great fortune, such as is Darcy, or a more recent fortune, as is Bingley. Collins has a fortune-to-be; the entailed estate of the Bennets will fall to him.

  1. Pride and Prejudice Jane Austen.

    explained what its effect on her had been, and how gradually all her former prejudices had been removed."(Chapter fifty-eight) Because she is ashamed of her ill judgements, her pride is also removed: "For herself, she was humbled, but she was proud of him."(Chapter fifty-two)

  2. Write a character sketch of anyone of your choice in ‘Pride and Prejudice’. This ...

    So when a letter arrives from Netherfield you can imagine how Mrs Bennet felt. Her ' eyes sparkled with pleasure. ' She was eager to know what it said and was utterly delighted by the request. So far her plan was working well.

  1. Darcy's Character

    It is a turning point because Elizabeth starts to see Darcy positively and realises that he had a reason for doing all the things that she had considered "wrong". Her judgement of Darcy came from her first impression and prejudice towards him.

  2. Examine the different marriage relationships and attitudes towards marriage presented in 'Pride and Prejudice'. ...

    under the care of Jane "Whose steady sense and sweetness of temper exactly adapted her for attending to them in every way - teaching them, playing with them and loving them." Jane would prefer to marry for love; however, because she is the oldest and by far the prettiest of

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work