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Consider how Shakespeare presents the character of Claudio and how interpretations of his character can vary

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Introduction

English Coursework 01/05/2007 Consider how Shakespeare presents the character of Claudio and how interpretations of his character can vary Claudio is firstly presented, (though he is not in the scene where this takes place) as a brave, young and fresh addition to Don Pedro's troops and that he is quickly growing to be a hero and this is commented on by the messenger in the scene. He is extremely na�ve in the early scenes, he has a very simple and trusting view of the world and the way it works, he seems to be flirtatious, making him possibly desperate or genuinely in need of love. However a small part of what Claudio says could make him be seen as an almost sneaky and power hungry individual by the audience. Later in the play, in the scene where Claudio learns his wife has been unfaithful, he could be interpreted as a possibly sensitive and caring individual. However in Shakespeare's time, men were the dominant sex in society, it was biased, so this allows Claudio to be interpreted as someone who likes to remain looking big, strong, brave and in charge, perhaps making him self conscious. ...read more.

Middle

This leads to the quote "Hath Leonato any son my Lord?" which is an essential part of Claudio's speech as it could make him be interpreted as a power hungry individual, because if Leonato dies, Hero inherits his power and therefore Claudio would too and as males are dominant, he could see this as a route to power, making him appear fake. In Act 2, he is made to believe that Hero has been taken from him, despite being a little saddened, he appears not to be affected greatly, he realises that his naivety has made him vulnerable to untrustworthy people as he says "And trust no agent". His fellow soldiers detect this sadness and he says very little but he soon reverts to his usual mood as he realises Hero is still his. Compared with the film, Claudio in Act 1 and Act 2 is presented very similarly, brave, young, handsome, very na�ve, genuinely interested, slightly curious into the power that comes with Hero and sad when he is told wrongly that Hero is not his, the film has interpreted Claudio just as Shakespeare would of probably imagined him. ...read more.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Claudio can be interpreted in three varied ways, however, you must remember when the play is set and how men ruled at that time, his behaviour may have been acceptable at that time which is why he does and says certain things. Claudio can be perceived as a na�ve person because he believes everything will be alright all of the time and that he is genuinely in love and genuinely hurt when it does not work out and therefore genuinely sorry when he learns on the real truth, making him seem an innocent and na�ve. Another way he can be perceived is as a cocky, self centred and self conscious individual and that he lies to look good in front of his friends, and that he believes he is the victim and the dominant male which no female should abuse, which is most probably acceptable in Shakespeare's time and finally Claudio can be perceived as a cold minded individual, who wants power, and is prepared to be self centred and aggressive to get it. The Kenneth Branagh film certainly uses a variety of these interpretations, especially the first and second ones however the first is seen more often in the film. (1533 Words) ...read more.

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