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Consider the dramatic importance of the entrance of the Inspector in Act 1 and his exit in Act 3

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Introduction

Consider the dramatic importance of the entrance of the Inspector in Act 1 and his exit in Act 3 Although the inspector does not enter until a while into the play, it is clear that his presence will shock the Birling family. The play is set in a house of a reasonable middle upper class family. The family's attire is very formal and displays to the audience the family's wealth. The entrance of the inspector brings a massive amount of dramatic irony and his entrance is immensely important to the views Priestley is trying to portray in the play. Likewise his exit lulls the family into a false sense of security. ...read more.

Middle

He has strong beliefs and is clearly not easily swayed in his views. It is obvious Birling has worked hard for his wealth and is excessively proud of his status in current society. Birling also stresses this numerous times to all the characters he is involved in dialogue with right through the play, For example " I was lord mayor two years ago." The audience is shown immediately that Birling is a very proud person; Priestley uses dialogue to impact this on the audience. Birling basks in his high social status and is elated at the fact that his daughter is marrying "above them," another building block for Birling's oversized ego. ...read more.

Conclusion

Whereas both Priestley and the audience are fully aware that war does occur. Bringing with it more irony and adding to Priestley's constant mockery of Birling. Previous to the inspector's entrance, the atmosphere in the Birling household is highly warm, celebratory and comfortable. The family is celebrating a successful engagement that will result in the Birling's furthering their status. Birling is feeling confident and therefore he makes some smug, pompous speeches to his family. Almost everything he says is false in retrospect. Irony is increased, as Birling gives Eric and Gerald a speech on how to live their lives, the audience are aware that Birling should definitely not preach about this subject. The dramatic impact of the doorbell is immense and plays a huge role in the play as it interrupts a typical Birling lecture, symbolising the end of Birling being "Top dog." ...read more.

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