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Consider the ways in which the Miller presents John the Carpenter in The Miller's Tale.

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Introduction

Consider the ways in which the Miller presents John the Carpenter in The Miller's Tale. In your answer you should pay particular attention; - Vocabulary and style - Form - Any other features of language you consider to be important John the Carpenter is a character who Chaucer uses to make an example of someone who is extremely gullible. To some extent, the nature of which he is gullible can often be unbelievable because some of the things he does are of a farcical nature; "Y-geten us thise kneeding-tubbes three, Than shaltou hang hem in the roof full hye" The Carpenter is a central character in the plot because he is the person who the majority of the 'jokes' and farces are based upon. The fact that he has such a gullible nature means that he is easily tricked into believing anything of an absurd nature, this usually being from Nicholas. ...read more.

Middle

And shall she drench? Alas, mine Alisoun!" Chaucer decides to portray all of his characters in different lights. The characters in The Miller's Tale have specific purposes and through the way Chaucer treats his characters helps to create different plots and settings. The central characters have their own section at the beginning of the tale where they are given a description, however, John is never formally introduced to the audience. We mainly find the traits of John's character through Chaucer's thoughts of him which are given as interjections throughout the tale. The carpenter is never a full description but a persona of him is built up through a number of opinions inserted during descriptions of other characters. This suggests from the beginning, the Chaucer does not attach much importance to the character of John and sees other characters as being more important, for example, Alison and Absolon who are described in detail at the beginning. ...read more.

Conclusion

It is clear that Chaucer tries to show John as being the least important, and Alison as predominantly having the rule over both the other two men. However, Chaucer presents the carpenter as being the opposite of how a stereotypical man is. Usually, it would be the man who powers of the woman, yet in the tale we see a reverse in roles, thus showing the carpenter as being weak and unable to defend himself against the strong nature of his wife. Once again, the whole image of the carpenter being gullible and his wife having 'the upper-hand', adds to the farce which the whole tale is, and contributes to mocking the theme of Courtley Love and the Fabliaux. The Miller is merely presented in the way he is, so that a light-hearted, humouress tone can be added to the tale. The acts of foolish carpenter make unlikely situations occur which are simply laughable at; creating an entertaining tone for the audience. ...read more.

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