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Considering the evidence from the play I believe that Lady Macbeth had the qualities of a fiend-like Queen until the death of Duncan.

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Introduction

Macbeth In the final act of play Malcolm states that Lady Macbeth is a "fiend like" Queen. Considering the evidence from the play I believe that Lady Macbeth had the qualities of a "fiend-like" Queen until the death of Duncan. At this point she begun to show guilt and felt disconnected from everyone around her. If Lady Macbeth was truly "fiend-like" she would not feel any remorse, so therefore I maintain that she is not a "fiend-like" Queen. We first met Lady Macbeth in Act1, Scene 5 in a room in her castle. At this point Lady Macbeth is a woman who is full of love for her husband. She wants her husband to be great and wants him to succeed in life. Once she reads the letter from her husband and learns about the three witches and their predictions we see a drastic change in her personality. Some critics say that that at the beginning of the play Lady Macbeth was like a fourth witch. ...read more.

Middle

Only a true "fiend" could make a statement of such wickedness. Eventually Lady Macbeth manipulates Macbeth into the murder once again and we realise there is certainly an element of truth in Malcolm's claim. Act 2 Scene 2 Lady Macbeth gave the guards a liquid which "made them drunk" Then Lady Macbeth waits for her husband. Once Macbeth enters he is distorted and we learn that he did not finish the job right. Lady Macbeth shows her strength by going and finishing the job and reassuring Macbeth all is well, she tells him, "These deeds must not be thought after these ways; so, it will make us mad." This is ironic as this drives Lady Macbeth to suicide later in the play. When the death of Duncan has been discovered Lady Macbeth pretends she knows nothing about the killing. She asks what is going on and faints when she sees Duncan's body. Lady Macbeth will do anything not to get caught. ...read more.

Conclusion

In Act 5 the doctor has been called to look after Lady Macbeth as she has been acting oddly in her sleep. Lady Macbeth now carries a light because the awful deed she did was done in the dark. Then she starts to rub her hands together. This is her imaging that there is still blood on her hands. (quote). This is ironic as she said earlier in the play, "That I little water clear us of this deed." The doctor soon realises what the problem is, "Unnatural deeds do breed unnatural troubles." And he claims in a chilling fashion "more needs she the divine than the physician." In Act 5 Scene 5 we see Lady Macbeth reaches her all time low. Lady Macbeth was so riddled with guilt and fear that she takes her own life. This is nothing like the Lady Macbeth that we first met who was the controlling and stronger than her husband but just moments before Lady Macbeth killed herself. Macbeth said "I have almost forgot the taste of fear." Which is ironic as Lady Macbeth took her own life because of fear. These actions were not of a true "fiend-like queen." ...read more.

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