• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Cream Cracker

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Look at the different dramatic techniques which Bennett uses in order to build up sympathy for Doris Cream cracker under the settee is another one of Alan Bennett's famous monologues known collectively as talking heads. These monologues feature everyday people living ordinary, monotonous lives. His characters usually undergo some kind of crisis or life episode where they learn something. Cream cracker under the settee was first televised in 1988. Throughout the play Bennett uses a variety of techniques to evoke a lot of sympathy for Doris, who is the main character in Cream Cracker. In the monologue there is only one actor that is Doris. This means the audience have to have an active imagination; she is an artless narrator and tells the truth as she sees. Because it is a single character, we see her just on her own; this shows the audience her isolation and evokes sympathy for Doris. Monologues are mainly one side of the story, so in cream cracker we don't get Zulema's view on things. ...read more.

Middle

He never got round to it." This quotation shows us that Wilfred was forever putting things off, Doris always felt that a kid would have solved everything. "A kiddy`d've solved all that." The one other person was the baby. Doris feels upset about her stillborn baby and was disgraced when the midwife said "it wasn't fit to be called anything" It is suggested that Doris has suffered tragedy in her life and we come to understand one of the reasons that Doris is on her own is because she has no children to look after her. This means that the audience sympathise with Doris wishing that she had kids. The language that Bennett uses to portray Doris is he uses colloquial language and features of Lancashire dialect; this is used to remind the audience of our own grandmothers. Using this technique helps to create sympathy towards Doris, and also adds more humour to the monologue. Another technique that creates sympathy for Doris is her isolation as she feels physically trapped in her own home with the occasional appearance of dictating Zulema. ...read more.

Conclusion

Doris's lack of freedom has been for a long time and she is a stranger in her own community. 'Don't know anybody round here know more' This quotation suggests that Doris used to live a pleasant life where everybody knew everyone. Know that society has moved on and she doesn't know any one she feels trapped. The significance of the title "A cream cracker under the settee" has a very important role in the monologue. The cream cracker plays an important role as once she has found it is the first time she feels she has power over Zulema where in fact the social services would just laugh at Doris if she tried to gain revenge by reported it. "Under the settee suggests out of sight, out of mind this shows the position of the elderly in society, and this is how Doris is seen. As if she is unnoticed and grown old like the cracker. The cracker signifies `crackers` - not all there this relates to Doris's state of mind. A cracker also snaps easily this shows the fragility of Doris. Another point is that crackers are quite boring and bland which represents Doris's current life. Jack Mullen 10C ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Alan Bennet section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Alan Bennet essays

  1. Studying Two Alan Bennett Monologues.

    How are they supposed to make you feel? The ending of a 'Lady of Letters' is supposed to make you feel happy for Irene. Alan Bennett wants you to empathise with Irene because everyone is lonely at some point in their life.

  2. Cream Cracker

    Alan Bennett also uses puns when Doris cracks the wedding photo of her and Wilfred. "Cracked the photo." "We're cracked, Wilfred. This is when Doris introduces humor/amusmant. Doris has reinforced being away from Wilfred and also Doris thinks that they have got us and they want me to go into a home.

  1. A cream cracker under the setee- by Alan Bennett (How does Alan Bennett ...

    She would be happier to die than to go into a home. She wants to finish off being independent and brave. We also realize how Doris is very superstitious. We see this when she is talking about her pram which she bought for the baby.

  2. Modern Drama - Talking Heads

    Irene Ruddock, in A Lady of Letters could perhaps be seen as a combination of the situations that the two other characters are in. While she is a woman who is having her problems in life and is quite lonely (similar to Susan), she tries to tell herself that the

  1. What impression does Bennett create of Doris'

    And they all stink of pee". Doris also has views about how life where she lives has changed. She says it used to be quite peaceful and you had neighbours looking after you, but nowadays she says she doesn't even know her neighbours.

  2. How does Bennett arouse our sympathy for Doris in "A Cream Cracker under the ...

    As Doris herself admits, she never gets "any bona fide callers." Doris finds herself very lonely now she does not have her husband Wilfred, who complemented her in her obsession to clean and keep herself to herself, to talk to.

  1. How does Bennett arouse our sympathy for Doris in "A Cream Cracker under the ...

    "Proper prams then, springs and hoods Big wheels." There can be no doubt of the sorrow that Doris felt, and still feels, when we learn that she has kept the baby's cloths safe for so many years. Her present situation is made even worse by the fact Doris is extremely lonely, as her husband had passed away.

  2. A Cream Cracker Under The Settee'

    Doris is jealous of Zulema's care-free life style, and longs to be back in the golden age, full of life and both emotionally and physically untroubled. Another unseen character mentioned continuously throughout the play and plays a crucial role in our understandings of the narrator's past history, is Wilfred.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work