• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Critical Commentary on The Arrival of the Bee Box written by Sylvia Plath.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Stephanie Duarte 13D Critical Commentary on The Arrival of the Bee Box The arrival of the Bee Box, is a poem written by Sylvia Plath where she the extended metaphor of a bee box to reflect her state of mind and her appearance. We can see that throughout the poem she does not feel at peace with herself. Her inner turmoil, illustrated by the bees, contrasts with what she shows herself to be, the box. However, to reveal her real feelings and thoughts, and to therefore open the box, means that there is a possibility of attack by its contents, a warning she seems anxious to ignore. We are immediately introduced to the bee box in the first stanza of the poem. She takes responsibility for the presence of the box as she says that "I ordered this". If we take this bee box to be her appearance, we can see how she has made a conscious effort to hide what she is really feeling. To demonstrate the unequivocal reality of the box she describes it is as being "square as a chair and almost too heavy to lift". ...read more.

Middle

In contrast to the previous stanza where she focused mainly on what she could see, in this stanza she starts to focus on what she can hear. The "noise" appalls" her for they are "unintelligible syllables". This again suggests that she does like this constant torment in her head specially since she cannot understand it. It is illustrated very well as the buzzing of bees usually annoys people and we cannot understand it. She then compares her situation to a "Roman mob". The bees are "small, taken one by one" but however they are always found "together". This is like the conflicts in her mind. They are not of great importance when looked at individually, but when looked at "together", they create great confusion which causes her to stop making sense out of them. In continuation from stanza four, stanza five starts by saying that she "lay [her] ear to furious Latin". This again implies that she cannot understand what is inside the box, or in other words, her mind. The word "furious" suggests once again that the bees, or her thoughts, are agitated and longing to come out but that at the same time they are dangerous. ...read more.

Conclusion

This point is conveyed through the verbal play on "honey" and "sweet". Ironically, by being "sweet" and by thus setting them free, she will be like "honey" which is what the bees are after. The last line of the poem is isolated from the rest of it. This brings great emphasis of this line. It states that "the box is only temporary". This is like a conclusion to the poem and to the great dilemmas which have taken place through it. The speaker has finally made a decision and asserts that she will release the bees, or in other words, reveal her feelings and the content will exceed the form. All in all, this is a very complex poem which allows us to have great insight into the poet's personal life. We can see how she feels bound to lose whether she chooses to open the been box, and to thus release her emotions, or whether she chooses to keep it closed, and to therefore never be able to be her real self. She takes us through a series of reasoning steps and eventually lead us to her conclusion. This conclusion however is only reached at the very end of the poem and thus keeps us in suspense all the way through. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Sylvia Plath section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Sylvia Plath essays

  1. What happens in the story? Superman and Paula Brown's New Snowsuit is a short ...

    It seems obvious to the reader, that all the people in the story get this wrong. Perhaps the children have some excuse, as their values reflect what they have been taught. But the grown ups in the story should know better.

  2. Poetry: Describe, Explain and Analyse The Poems I have chosen to discuss are:Roe-Deer ...

    She requests a box of bees, but when they arrive she is afraid of what they might do. This fear keeps her fascinated by the 'buzzing' box and thinks of what she could do with the boxed bees. The box of bee's cause of much anxiety because of the noise

  1. A Trapped Life: The Autobiographical Elements of Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar.

    Her problem with men may have stemmed from the torn relationship between Plath and her father. Plath understood how adolescents felt and the obstacles they faced. Schimelpfening stated: She [Plath] struggles within herself to reconcile her desires to become a writer in a world where woman are expected to be

  2. Compare and contrast Sylvia Plath 'Blackberrying', Sylvia Plath 'Mirror' and Elizabeth Jennings 'My Grandmother' ...

    has died it's not until the young and fresh come in to start all over again that the old dust is set free to settle somewhere else. The structure of this poem is very important, the way the poem is spilt into four verses to separate the different stages of the last part of her life.

  1. By referring closely to the text demonstrate how Norris has made the poem “The ...

    line and in so doing adds to the rhyme of the poem. Norris uses these two techniques in most of his paragraphs to add speed and consequently make the rhyme stand out. "From Fishponds to watch Portsmouth in the cup.

  2. Discuss the presentation of death within Plath's poetry, commenting upon how your view compares ...

    by Plath" This view is further supported by Plath's use of 'sterile' visual images such as the "white serpent" and "hood of bone"; and also by the chilling metaphors used to describe the children, reminiscent of the death of Cleopatra, killed by an asp.

  1. This poem is a compilation of Sylvia Plath's innermost feelings of the time. "Spinster" ...

    The significance of the word ceremonious is to reiterate the fact that this occasion is a ritual and instead of pleasure, it has become an obligation. The girl instead of being enchanted by the intoxicating beauty of nature "finds herself...intolerably struck / By the birds' irregular babel / And the leaves litter" (4-6).

  2. The three poems I have chosen to compare are 'A Parental Ode To My ...

    and certainly quite depressing. G. Clarke has written a poem through the eyes of a mother viewing her daughter. Already it has the same characteristics as 'A Parental Ode...' In the first stanza the mother talks about the time when she gave birth to Catrin and how she has developed, which is described in the present day.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work