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Critical Evaluation - The Narrator's role in F. Scott Fitzgerald The Great Gatsby is taken on by Nick Carraway.

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Introduction

THE GREAT GATSBY CRITICAL EVALUATION The Narrator's role in F. Scott Fitzgerald The Great Gatsby is taken on by Nick Carraway. In this role Nick reveals the character of the rich and mysterious Jay Gatsby. Nick talks of the events in a first person perspective from a point two years into the future. From this we know that Nick is displaying the story in an objective manner since the emotion of the summer has calmed down The Great Gatsby is a summary of the roaring twenties and an expos� of the lifestyle of the rich in the jazz age. It tells the story of Nick Carraway, a young bondsman looking to make his fortune, his cousin Daisy Buchanan, her husband Tom Buchanan, a polo player and Daisy's lover before her marriage the mysterious Jay Gatsby Just before Nick's meets Gatsby he sees him from afar looking over his party. Gatsby standing alone on the marble steps and looking from one group to another with approving eyes. This reveals firstly that, although Gatsby throws big parties, he is somewhat of a loner. Gatsby looks over his guests approvingly while unknown to him they are concocting wild and fanciful rumours about his past. ...read more.

Middle

When the five of them go to the Plaza Hotel for a drink Gatsby confronts Daisy about whether she has ever loved her husband, Tom or if she, has always loved Gatsby. Gatsby thinks as Daisy as a possession and tries to wrest her from Tom. "Of course ... do you see" shows that Gatsby believes that Daisy never loved Tom and has just been waiting for him, when she had actually forgotten about Gatsby and had loved Tom instead. Daisy is torn between her old love, who has returned to her like some sort of fairy tale, and her husband, to whom she must stay committed to or her reputation will be ruined. Clutching at some last hope. Gatsby does not understand this and thinks that everyone thinks the same as him, that he found Daisy first so she was his. Gatsby is so devoted to Daisy that he takes the blame for her hit and run accident with Tom's mistress. Because of the position of the Narrator we do not learn of how Tom feels about this but only the moments that Nick spends at the Buchanan's home. Gatsby shows his infatuation with Daisy when Nick meets him outside of their house, where he is watching to make sure nothing happens "I don't trust him, old sport.". ...read more.

Conclusion

Although the text colluded with the sexism of the times, for Nick too was a little sexist, when Tom announced that it was shameful of his wife to have an affair while he had been doing it all the time, the sexism was also critiqued, for Nick wanted to laugh at him for his blatant contradiction. Had Nick liked Tom it would have been a different story. In order to tell a convincing story, the narrator needs our trust. Nick Carraway was a trustworthy narrator, although not completely. He gained our trust in the beginning with a recount of his moral upbringing and his initial inclination to reserve all judgements, but he also said "tolerance.... has it's limits". This story was told through a dual narration, it was an older, wiser and less na�ve Nick telling us what happened a year earlier. At the beginning Nick visited Tom, a man that at the time he didn't really know, but by the end he detested. This led to the older Nick immediately passing his judgement and Tom being described as a negative character, right from the beginning of the story. We do however, stick to Nick's judgement, for he seems to us and also to those around him a harmless and trusting man. It is this trust that Nick uses to uphold his credibility. ...read more.

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