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Crucible-In what kind of a community does Miller root Procter?

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Introduction

GCSE English Literature coursework - The Crucible Essay Title: In what kind of a community does Miller root Procter? The play is set in Salem, Massachusetts, in the spring year of 1692 and features a society of Puritans. The setting of the play is near the edge of a forest where the American continent stretched endlessly west. Furthermore, the people of Salem were terrified of persecution by the Indian tribes from all sides, since they lived in a settlement where the people had fled from persecution in England because of their beliefs. The tyranny of the Indians is explained in Miller's commentary, "Indian tribes marauded (raided) from time to time", and "Parris had parishioners who had lost relatives to these heathen". In the play when Betty tries to fly out of the window in Act One, Abigail threatens the girls and says "I saw Indians smash my dear parent's heads on the pillow next to mine". ...read more.

Middle

No books apart from the bible was allowed to be read in Salem. The people of Salem were influenced to such an extent that they were told what to do and what to think by the Church, hence there was no individualism. Furthermore, the community had to act as a unity in order to survive the hostile environment. Therefore there could be no philosophy of individualism, as they would not have survived. However in the course of the play, the community featured fragments. This disintegration of Salem is the result of many things but mainly because of the society's belief in witches. This allowed a hysteria to develop. The first crucial event that led to Salem's hysteria is when the girls are caught dancing in the woods. This is forbidden in the community due to their strict beliefs, as shown in the warning Mary gives, ...Abby! You'll only be whipped for dancin', and the other things! ...read more.

Conclusion

Thomas Putnam for example exploits the hysteria by making his daughter cry witch against George Jacobs so he can buy his land. This was pointed out by Giles to Danforth in the court, There is none but Putnam with the coin to buy so great a piece. This man is killing his neighbours for that land! Furthermore, Goody Putnam jealously accuses Rebecca Nurse of murdering her babies because Rebecca has never lost a child while Putnam lost all but one. These clear schemes go unnoticed by this unjust court, as the accused are sentenced to their undeserved fate The immorality of the court has stretched to such extent, that if a member of Salem's community believed that the court was unjust, then they would be accused of trying to overthrow the court and were clapped in jail. The Salem tragedy in the end was caused not by persecution, oppression or tyranny from the outside but from the greed, jealousy and priestly arrogance of the people within Salem. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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