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Daffodils Appreciation

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Introduction

Daffodils Appreciation In the poem `Daffodils`, Wordsworth eloquently uses figurative language, imagery, and personification to describe a scenic display of daffodils. It is through his description of, feelings behind, and reaction to the daffodils that craftily reveal the true meanings of this text. In the first verse Wordsworth describes himself to wander `lonely as a cloud`. He identifies himself as a solitary creature alone in a void of privacy. In the next line he sees the daffodils, describing them as a crowd (`A host of golden daffodils`). Wordsworth went from being alone to the total opposite, completely surrounded and overwhelmed by a presence (the daffodils). We can also find impact in the several meanings of the word `host` used in line 4. The word `host` can also mean: `crowd,` `swarm,` `congregation` and `mass.` Wordsworth's usage of the word `host` creates images of community and strength in numbers.

Middle

Both objects work in unison, but the difference between the two is that when Wordsworth looks at the waves he only sees one object. When he looks at the daffodils he sees `ten thousand` objects! The waves lack strength in numbers, which is the one aspect of the daffodils which impresses Wordsworth the most; the fact that these `ten thousand` separate things can unite and `dance` so beautifully together. The manner in which Wordsworth arranges each line in verses 1 and 2 places emphasis on the significance that the daffodils are working communally. Each verse has six lines, and in the first five lines of verses 1 and 2, Wordsworth hits us with these collective images. But in the last lines of each verse, lines 6 and 12, Wordsworth effectively impresses upon us the image of the daffodils moving as one. It is not by coincidence that Wordsworth creates so many images of community and then hits us over the head with images of working together in verses 1 and 2.

Conclusion

Notice, Wordsworth is back to `wandering` again. He is alone, and again in that void of privacy where he can get lost in thought. And it is only in this `mood` that the daffodils `flash upon that inward eye`. Wordsworth describes the `inward eye` as `the bliss of solitude`. Through this we can interpret the `inward eye` to signify Wordsworth's reflection of the solitary individual upon himself. But here, Wordsworth describes the solitude as blissful because being alone made him able to gain this perspective. And finally, in the last two lines of the poem, Wordsworth describes what happens when in his blissful solitude, he thinks of the daffodils. `And then my heart with pleasure fills, And dances with the daffodils`. Wordsworth ends his poem with another usage of personification. It is only through this distanced perspective, that of being in `blissful solitude,` when he is able to really appreciate and reflect on the impact the daffodils have on him. ?? ?? ?? ??

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