• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Dear Mr Chapman & Hall, This is your faithful servant Charles Dickens, and once again I thank you for having faith in me and publishing my latest book, A Christmas Carol.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Dear Mr Chapman & Hall, This is your faithful servant Charles Dickens, and once again I thank you for having faith in me and publishing my latest book, A Christmas Carol. I have a feeling that this book shall be greatly appreciated and well received by the public. I will explain to you my purposes and the ways in which I have endeavoured to make it palatable and instructive. This novel is dominated by one character, Ebenezer Scrooge. The point of the story is to show how and why he changes. I have used all my talent to make him as un-likeable as I can, and this can be seen right from the beginning of the story, when I described him as, "a tight-fisted hand at the grindstone... a squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scraping, clutching, covetous, old sinner!" This is when I think it suitable for my readers to really take a strong dislike to him. I have deemed it appropriate to describe Scrooge by likening him to the winter weather, as if he "carried his own temperature" while noting that no weather has any effect on him, "no warmth could heat him, no wintry weather chill him". There is no hint that this sinister figure will become the comical Scrooge of the last chapter. As a child he enjoys the pleasures of the imagination, and he is close to his sister. ...read more.

Middle

This drives home to Scrooge that he could be one of the surplus population, as could Tiny Tim or indeed any one of us. I choose to illustrate an old person to show that no one is too set in his or her ways to change, and that change is possible even late in life. This man who was shown to be a "covetous old sinner" at the beginning of the story has become "as good a friend, as good a master, and as good a man, as the good old city knew, or any other good old city, town, or borough, in the good old world." Therefore we see the complete change of character that the Christmas spirit has had on Scrooge, and this forwards a message to my readers that all of us can change for the better if only we let the magic of Christmas work. The three spirits and Marley are unusual in that Scrooge listens to them. At first he resists, but he rapidly learns not to oppose them. Where Marley is grotesquely comic, the first spirit is gentle and pitying, the second hearty and authoritative, and the third silently persuasive. I deem that the last spirit is the most overwhelming and powerful, because of his silence and ominous omniscience. We are moved by Tiny Tim's courage and cheerfulness, in spite of his poverty and disability. ...read more.

Conclusion

An important symbol in A Christmas Carol appears in stave one, where Marley is weighed down by a massive chain, and tells Scrooge he has an even longer chain: it was as long as Marley's seven years ago, and he has "laboured on it since" This chain, made up of cash-boxes, padlocks, purses and business documents, represents Scrooge's achievement in life - earning money which weighs down his spirit. We understand that all the hard work and penny pinching that Marley employed during his life now haunts him during his death, and he warns Scrooge that his chain will be must greater, for he has laboured longer and at a greater pace. At the end of stave three, Scrooge sees under the robe of the Ghost of Christmas Present, two children, whose names show that they are symbols: Ignorance and Want. I deem that a lack of education and extreme poverty makes it impossible for anyone to have a good life, and I have endeavoured to make this as clear as possible. Of the two, the Ghost tells Scrooge to beware the boy " most of all" because ignorance allows poverty to continue. I hope for this message to be taken in by my readers as they read this, and do something to change the social conditions in our present-day social conditions. Once again, thank you for publishing for me and I hope that my story, A Christmas Carol, may bring happiness and enlightenment on many a reader. Yours truly, Mr Charles Dickens ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE A Christmas Carol section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE A Christmas Carol essays

  1. "Explore the theme of a change in Christmas carol by Charles Dickens"

    This visit of his past is over and now and it has been a very adventurous experience full of sad emotions and happiness. However the aim for the spirit was to obviously change Scrooge and looking at his past he would try and compare to the present, which shows what a variation the two types of Scrooge have in them.

  2. A Christmas Carol - Marley's Ghost.

    So he listened for the hour. To his great astonishment, the heavy bell went on from six to seven, and from seven to eight, and regularly up to twelve; then stopped. Twelve! It was past two when he went to bed.

  1. Dickens’ A Christmas Carol and Priestley’s An Inspector Calls have strong messages for the ...

    big town in the country," "If there weren't, the factories and warehouses wouldn't know where to look for cheap labour," this is a general social point Priestley is making as well as the fact that there is no clear dividing line between different elements of society, for example, Gerald says, "we're respectable citizens not criminals!"

  2. To What Extent does Dickens's 'A Christmas Carol' fit into the Genre of the ...

    Deny it!'" Scrooge asks the spirit if there is any refuge for him and his words from the first stave are echoed by the spirit: "' Are there no prisons?' said the spirit, turning on him for the last time with his own words.

  1. What makes 'A Christmas Carol' such a Powerful and memorable story

    him froze his old features, nipped his pointed nose, shrivelled his cheek, stiffened his gait; made his eyes red, his thin lips blue; and spoke out shrewdly in his grating voice.' This is a perfect example of vivid details as you can imagine the facial expression of Scrooge and how

  2. How does Charles Dickens manipulate readers feeling about Ebenezer Scrooge throughout the Christmas Carol?

    By looking at this you can easily identify that Scrooge doesn't celebrate Christmas or believe in it, as he stays home alone eating porridge, while people are having a great time outside. It also tells us that everyone loves Christmas excluding Scrooge, as he thinks Christmas is a perfect day of "robbing" a man.

  1. A Christmas Carol Assignment - Charles Dickens

    This neglect could have a dramatic effect on a young boy's development, such as Scrooge's poor social skills, and his always being 'alone' could change him mentally and lead to his becoming the bad-tempered man that we first meet who says he prefers to be alone.

  2. Images of London in ‘A Christmas Carol’ by Charles Dickens, and a ‘Kiss Miss ...

    Jolil has to save up his travel money to bribe his brother-no luxury pocket money there. (Lines 161-163). "He watched the needle go in and out of the patches of grey clothes, like the beak of a bird pecking down a lines of crumbs".

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work