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Death of a Salesman. Nothings planted. I don't have a thing in the ground. Was Willy just talking about planting a garden?

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Introduction

"Nothing's planted. I don't have a thing in the ground." Was Willy just talking about planting a garden? In Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman, Willy reference to planting seeds its not only talking about a garden but also represents a metaphorical meaning behind it. Gardening is a metaphor for success and failure of Willy's profession as a salesman, even though his roots are sales. In the play, Willy talks to Stanley about buying seeds to plant backyard because he does not have 'a thing in the ground'. ...read more.

Middle

It represents Willy's opportunity to prove the worth of his labour, both as a salesman and a father. His attempt to try and grow vegetables signifies his shame about barely being able to put food on the table and to provide for his family. Also, having nothing to leave his children when he dies. The seeds also symbolise Willy's sense of failure with Biff. Willy finally realises that he has been a failure and that he needs to starts over. ...read more.

Conclusion

Willy has set his sight on ending his life to realise his life assurance and to further provide for his family. By planting the seeds into the ground he will soon bear fruits. Just like when his body is buried in the ground, his family will receive the 20,000 dollars insurance money. By planting seeds into the ground, he will be assured that his life was not meaningless and that his legacies will the bountiful produce. After having such a barren career. Willy does this as a final act to ensure that he provides for his family and in a sense to commemorate his life. ?? ?? ?? ?? Death of a Salesman ...read more.

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