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Describe how Arthur Miller creates an exciting climax for both acts of 'A View from the Bridge'.

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Introduction

Twentieth century drama English coursework "Describe how Arthur Miller creates an exciting climax for both acts of 'A View from the Bridge'" 'A View from the Bridge' by Arthur Miller, is a play about obsession and betrayal. The main character, Eddie Carbone, becomes overprotective over his niece, Catherine, to the degree of infatuation. This obsession helps to cause the break down of Eddie's marriage, as his wife, Beatrice realises the alarming nature of Eddie's fixation. Eddie's feelings for Catherine existed before Beatrice's cousins, Marco and Rodolfo came, but their arrival intensifies the situation, as Eddie becomes more and more jealous of Rodolfo, and of Catherine's love for him. This play is a tragedy and, like most tragedies, it is serious and ends with the death of the main character, Eddie. Eddie dies after betraying his wife's cousins to the immigration bureau. As a result, Marco, who is filled with hatred and in need of justice, stabs him. Arthur Miller was a New Yorker who worked on the Brooklyn docks, for a time. His experience of the docks and of the people around them, led him to write this play, which is set there. During this coursework, my aim is to study the ends of the two acts in depth to see what techniques Miller uses to make them dramatically effective. ...read more.

Middle

Eddie started by just being over protective of Catherine, which developed into jealousy of Rodolfo because Catherine loved him and this, in turn developed into passionate hatred of both Marco and Rodolfo. Eddie hardly understands what he himself is feeling at the end of the play. These emotional changes are central to Arthur miller's play since they help to cause the chain of events leading up to the final tragic end and are very important in creating interest and drama in the play. 2. The changes in Eddie during the play also have consequences on the people around him, especially on Beatrice. Eddie spends less and less time throughout the play with Beatrice socially and more importantly, he spends less time with her intimately. There is evidence in other scenes that the sexual part of the Carbone's marriage has already collapsed but that Beatrice desperately wants to save the marriage by sitting down and sorting things out. We see in the last scene (beginning on page 60) that Beatrice has started to fear Eddie, 'BEATRICE: (With fear, going to Eddie)' She knows that Eddie doesn't want her to go to Catherine's wedding and may get angry with her, but she loves her niece and wants to go. This stage direction is also used by Miller to create atmosphere and show just how much the Carbone's marriage has broken down from how it was at the beginning, when the couple were comfortable and happy together. ...read more.

Conclusion

Eddie feels that Marco telling people this was unjustified (even though Marco only did it because Eddie told the authorities that Marco and Rodolfo were illegal immigrants) when characters in this play feel that someone else is wronging them they are unhesitant to accuse and to bring around their idea of justice. When however they are thought to be in the wrong they do not like to admit this. Eddie in particular is like this and this constant movement of blame partly causes the events of this play to go so horribly wrong. 9. The audience may feel that to some extent everyone is to blame for the brutal ending of this play. Marco is to blame in part, because he aggravated the situation with Eddie through his accusations (though in many ways his accusations were justified). Eddie could be seen to blame for the tragic events since they all seem to stem from his extreme feelings for his niece (these made him jealous, and willing to do anything to get rid of Marco and Rodolfo even betray them) 10. Conclusion- answer question. The key to Arthur millers excellent build up of tension seems to be giving the audience slight insight into the future of the play so that they can guess as to potential events in the play, but never giving them too much so that the ending is spoilt. Building up characters realistically also seems to be very important to this; the audience must be able to understand the character's viewpoints. ...read more.

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