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Digging by Seamus Heaney, Catrin by Gillian Clarke, Little Boy Lost, Little Boy Found by William Blake and On My First Son by Ben Jonson.

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Introduction

POEMS The four poems that I have chosen to study are Digging by Seamus Heaney, Catrin by Gillian Clarke, Little Boy Lost, Little Boy Found by William Blake and On My First Son by Ben Jonson. All of theses poems express an issue of love and are all indirectly linked by some way or another on the issue of love. Digging is a poem about admiration, how Seamus Heaney as a young boy looks up to his predecessors and how he has; "No spade to follow men like them" (Line 28 digging) Catrin has a basic structure of love that is becoming more and more common in today's world, and that is emotional love. Catrin doesn't show love for her child but it is still a bond between them and can never be broken. There are two lines in catrin which dispute this idea. "From the hearts pool that old rope, tightening about my life" (lines 25-26 catrin) ...read more.

Middle

"Once I carried him milk in a bottle sloppily corked with paper. He straightened up too drink it, then fell to right away." (Lines 18-19 Digging) Each stanza of Digging takes you further and further back in time, and with it progresses a good use of imagery "The cold smell of potato mould, the squelch and slap of soggy peat, the curt cuts of an edge." (Lines 25-26 Digging) This to me conjures up a wonderful picture, using the senses of sight and smell. "The curt cut of an edge" this makes you believe that the cut of peat is professional and neat. "Through living roots awaken in my head" (line 27 Digging) Just as easily as a sense triggered his flashback he gets bought back, probably because the digging outside has stopped. The poem finishes with "Between my thumb and finger the squat pen rests" this line opens and closes the poem with the last line being a metaphor. ...read more.

Conclusion

At the end of the poem the entire thing is made clear, why this has come up. "As you ask may you skate in the dark, for one more hour." Both poems evoke an entirely different response; Digging evokes a mark of respect for older generations and is love for them. Catrin is different and responds to the emotional ties and links that complicate so many families. I prefer digging because it uses a good use of imagery and I feel that I can relate and imagine what was going on, how and why it was happening. This used to be close to the way of life and I think that that was much better without the pollution and distractions of the modern day. I don't like catrin as much because it reminds me of how the world is today and just how a lot of things shouldn't be, but it shows a good representation of life. All four poems evoke love but all in different ways this is a good representation because everyone is different person. ...read more.

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