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Discuss all the different types of love found in Romeo and Juliet, and explain Shakespeare's view of the 'power of love'.

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Introduction

Romeo and Juliet, the original love story. But what is love? Romeo has 'fashionable love' for Rosaline, Juliet has a 'practical and strong love' for Romeo and Mercutio and the Nurse have a 'bawdy' view of love. Hence there is no one true meaning for the word 'love' in Shakespeare's play. In this essay I shall attempt to discuss all the different types of love found in Romeo and Juliet, and explain Shakespeare's view of the 'power of love'. In the first scene of the play we see the 'bawdy' view of love from Sampson and Gregory. They speak of raping the Montague maids: "'Tis true; and therefore women, being the weaker vessels, are ever thrust to the wall. Therefore I will push Montague's men from the wall, and thrust his maids to the wall," Sampson and Gregory are speaking of women as 'sex objects' that they will rape after killing Montague's men. This is a bawdy and sexual view of love as it is only based around sex. Mercutio and the Nurse share this bawdy view of love, as shown in Act 2, Scene 4, "A bawd, a bawd, a bawd! So ho!" says Mercutio, commenting on the Nurse. A bawd is another word for a woman with loose morals showing Mercutio's sexual view of love: "An 'a speak anything against me, I'll take him down, an 'a were lustier than he is, and twenty such Jacks; and if cannot, I'll find those that shall! ...read more.

Middle

In Act 2, Scene 4, Romeo convinces her despite of her bawdy view of love that he truly loves Juliet, "Good heart, and i'faith I will tell her as much. Lord, Lord! She will be a joyful woman," says the Nurse, when Romeo convinces her. Then in Act 2, Scene 5 Juliet starts by waiting for the nurse to hear what Romeo said to her. When the Nurse arrives, Juliet is desperately trying to make the Nurse tell her what Romeo said. The Nurse does not tell Juliet until the end of the scene so that she knows that Juliet really loves Romeo, "I'faith, I am sorry that thou art not well. Sweet, sweet, sweet Nurse, tell me, what says my love?" says Juliet as she shows the Nurse her true love for Romeo. Juliet's persistence through this scene shows her enthusiasm as a result of her strong love for Romeo. Act 2, Scene 6 is the wedding of Romeo and Juliet. Before Juliet arrives, Friar Lawrence says to Romeo, "These violent delights have violent ends," which means that this kind of love that Romeo has for Juliet often ends violently, which it does as the two end with suicide. Romeo's love for Juliet, as suggested by the prologue, "The fearful passage of their death-marked love," ends in his suicide. Even when Juliet is 'dead', Romeo speaks of her in a romantic way, "For here lies Juliet, and her beauty makes This vault a feasting presence full of light," which shows their eternal love. ...read more.

Conclusion

And, if thou darest, I'll give thee remedy." This shows that he realises that Juliet and Romeo would literally do anything for each other, even undergoing the closest thing to death itself. His plans do cause the death of the two, because of the problems with timing and the letter not getting to Romeo. From the play 'Romeo and Juliet' we can see that Shakespeare's view of the power of love is that true love can take two people to any depths. The end of the tragedy is ironic as the characters hint on it throughout the play and the reader can see it coming, without even reading the prologue. The Friar says the Romeo killing himself would in theory kill Juliet too, which is what happens in the end. The Friar also says, "These violent delights have violent ends," which is what happens in the end as they both die, as well as Paris. Paris' presence as Romeo arrives to see Juliet comes as a surprise, but his grief and woe for Juliet is real, and therefore he has earned a place next to Juliet. Shakespeare has used different types of love in the play to show that true love is the most powerful of all, as none other could defeat the love of Romeo and Juliet. ?? ?? ?? ?? Examine the different types of love in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet By Amir Ashrafi 10H ...read more.

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