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Discuss how an audience will react to Shakespeare's Presentation of Romeo throughout the course of Romeo and Juliet. Focus closely on the Dramatic techniques and language used in the play.

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Introduction

Nicholas Atkins Monday 23rd February 2004 Discuss how an audience will react to Shakespeare's Presentation of Romeo throughout the course of Romeo and Juliet. Focus closely on the Dramatic techniques and language used in the play Shakespeare is a famous writer who wrote many famous plays, probably his most famous being Romeo and Juliet. Romeo and Juliet is about a couple who fall in love and get married, despite their families feud which has been going on for generations. Shakespeare cleverly didn't write what the feud was about, because it helps get his theme of unresolved conflict leads to tragedy across. Shakespeare also uses fate as a theme and gets this across by writing that fate conspires against them; 'star-crossed lovers.' This fate conspires so much against Romeo and Juliet that it is unrealistic to a modern day (contemporary) audience, but in a Shakespearean audience it didn't matter because as long as it was entertaining it was accepted. This essay is about the reaction of a Shakespearean audience and a contemporary audience would have towards Romeo throughout the play. Throughout Romeo and Juliet Shakespeare presents Romeo as a young man overcoming his adolescence. ...read more.

Middle

To both audiences killing is one of the worst acts you can perform, which makes them disappointed that Romeo could do such a thing. A contemporary audience may also believe that Tybalt deserved it, as his character is one who is hot headed. Romeo realises his mistake in killing Tybalt immediately after killing Tybalt: "O I am fortunes fool!" The Prince of Verona banishes Romeo and if he is caught in Verona he will be killed. Romeo uses Friar Lawrence's cell to hide himself. In Friar Lawrence's cell Romeo is very distressed with the news of being banished away from Verona and Juliet and becomes hot headed and immature: "There is no world without Verona walls, But Purgatory, torture, Hell itself." Romeo's judgement is clouded by his emotions, he even goes as far to attempt to stab himself! Both audiences would feel saddened for Romeo having to leave Verona and his recently married wife, Juliet. A Shakespearean audience would be horrified by this suicidal attempt though, due to religious beliefs. If you attempted to take your own life it is considered murder because your life belongs to God and you have no right to take it. ...read more.

Conclusion

Romeo visits what he believes is Juliet's corpse and drinks the poison and dies. When Juliet wakes up to find Romeo death she kisses him in hope that some poison will still be on Romeo's lips, enough to kill her, but there isn't. Instead Juliet finds that his lips are warm, meaning Romeo was still alive not long ago. This is Shakespeare's use of irony here again. Juliet ends up taking up Romeo's knife and kills herself. A contemporary audience would have different reactions towards Romeo's actions to a Shakespearean audience. This is due to the two different audiences having different cultures. Today's audiences are more realistic then a Shakespearean audience. A Shakespearean audience would be very religious, making certain parts of the play more meaningful to them. Today's audience would not be so religiously influenced. The opinions on the reactions of Romeo throughout the essay may be completely different to what the majority of Shakespearean and contemporary audiences, because the two different audiences would react depending upon the individuals in the audiences. Shakespeare's themes of 'unresolved conflict leads to tragedy' and 'fate' are got across to us because of all the unrealistic bad luck Romeo and Juliet have. Due to the conflict, Mercutio, Tybalt, Paris, Romeo and Juliet are all dead, as the Prince says; 'all are punished.' ...read more.

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