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Discuss how Shakespeare uses language to explain Othello's character in Act III Scene III. To what extent is Iago to blame for Othello's sudden change in character towards Desdemona?

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Introduction

Discuss how Shakespeare uses language to explain Othello's character in Act III Scene III. To what extent is Iago to blame for Othello's sudden change in character towards Desdemona? The purpose of this essay is to discuss the factors that effect Othello's change in attitude towards Desdemona in Act III Scene III. It will also discuss the feelings towards race and marriage in the Shakespearian era. I will focus on Iago's use of language in order to manipulate Othello. In Shakespeare's time the attitudes towards marriage and affairs were very different to rules and regulations nowadays. Men were thought of very differently to women and were treated as a higher class. It was known for women to have other men besides their set husband during a marriage but is was not common and harshly dealt with, whereas the affairs of men were mostly overlooked, however unjust or unfair. The Christian teaching reflected heavily in the lifestyles of the married. Marriage was for reproduction, regulation of sexual activity and for mutual comfort and support. Men also married, not for love, but for property and money. The joining of Othello and Desdemona was unique because it was solely for love. Desdemona's father, Brabantio was oblivious of the blossoming relationship between his daughter and Othello. The marriage between Othello and Desdemona is very different to the stereotypical marriage of that time because Desdemona did not act as the inferior wife. ...read more.

Middle

In his sleep I heard him say, 'Sweet Desdemona, Let us be wary, let us hide our loves!' lines 417-418 act III scene III This starts the feeling of jealousy in Othello's heart. He begins to doubt Cassio's honesty. Othello is an extremely caring and adoring husband but does not quite have the qualities needed in a good marriage. No; once to be in doubt is once to be Resolved. This shows that if Othello finds one problem, he knows exactly what to do and is strong enough to resolve it. He would never give up. This is a perfect quality in a general however, marriages encounter numerous problems every day and Othello does not have the capabilities to deal with them. This is a serious disadvantage because he does not have what it takes to run a peaceful relationship expected of him. After talking to Othello about his fears of love between Cassio and the lovely Desdemona, Iago leaves Othello speculating miserably on the possible reason for Desdemona's disloyalty: his blackness, lack of social skills, and age. She's gone. I am abused, and my relief Must be to loathe her. O curse of marriage lines 266-267 act III scene III Already he is talking of loathing her, but when she appears to call him to dinner, he refuses to believe that such a creature could be false. At the end of the scene, Othello is in utter turmoil. He is extremely upset and vengeful. ...read more.

Conclusion

If Othello does not trust him, and Iago tries to accuse Cassio and Desdemona of adultery too early in the scene, then the blame may lay looking directly at him. Iago needs Othello to trust him if he is to water and nurture the seeds of suspicion already sown in Othello's mind. Throughout the whole of Act III Scene III, the audience has been captivated by the dramatic irony. Only the audience and Iago himself know of the ulterior motives the conversations that take place between the Othello and Iago with building tension. The audience is additionally intrigued by Iago's character. All the way through the scene, even the play, he becomes more devious and sly by the minute, yet the audience rather admire his technique and reluctance to let go and give up. His plan works right through until the end until Emilia realises what she has been oblivious to during the play. Othello even stabs him at the end in a last brutal attempt to take revenge on the man who wrecked his life. The audience feel shocked but great respect at his determination. This essay has discussed Act III Scene III and has broken it down to reveal and explains the incredible use of language by Shakespeare. Although the true story was written by Giambaltista Cinzio Giraldi in 1565. During this scene we witness a complete change in atmosphere and the characters behaviour as Othello begins to doubt and fear everything he once trusted. Iago drives hi mad with jealousy and loathing. ...read more.

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