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Discuss Jane Austen’s methods of portraying the character of Mr. Darcy in Pride And Prejudice. Is he a wholly unattractive character?

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Introduction

QUESTION. Discuss Jane Austen's methods of portraying the character of Mr. Darcy in Pride And Prejudice. Is he a wholly unattractive character? ANSWER. Cold, unfriendly, unapproachable, aloof. If someone was to mention Mr. Darcy when I first began to read Pride and Prejudice, those are the words, which would have sprung to mind. It is also clear to see that Mrs. Bennet's opinion of him was quite similar when she first met him at Netherfield ball. Mr. Bingley held the ball, one of Mr. Darcy's dearest friends. Mrs. Bennet described him as being "ate up with pride". Obviously, she was not very impressed! Mrs. Bennet is only able to "quite detest the man". ...read more.

Middle

Meanwhile Darcy is becoming clearly attracted by Elizabeth's independent spirit and "fine eyes". They seem to be flirting with each other. When Elizabeth and Mr. Wickham first get acquainted. Elizabeth is immediately won over by Wickham's easy, out-going manner and his charming conversation. Her inquisitiveness about the relationship between Darcy and Wickham is soon answered, when Wickham enquires about Darcy's whereabouts, plans, and Elizabeth's association with Darcy. Elizabeth willingly expresses her dislike of him; Wickham appears to take her into his confidence by giving an account of his past history. He makes himself out to be a real bighearted person, but it was a very different story. This does not make Elizabeth think any better of Darcy than before, in fact, it may have lowered her opinion of him even more. ...read more.

Conclusion

I feel that this is the turning point in the novel. Its timing is important , coming straight after the proposal. It changes much of Elizabeth's thinking about Darcy, but it's too late for her to do anything about it. It clears up misunderstandings or misjudgments from the past, such as the truth about Wickham. It gives Darcy a voice of his own for a good stretch as we have mostly seen him through the eyes of others, or at any rate, with others. In conclusion, I feel that Elizabeth and Darcy is an excellent match. They both misjudged each other, but came through all their problems and worked everything out. This is why I feel both are such a good match. Even though they have many differences, is it not true, that opposites attract? ...read more.

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