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Discuss the different kinds of love presented by Shakespeare in "Romeo and Juliet"

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Introduction

Discuss the different kinds of love presented by Shakespeare in "Romeo and Juliet" In 'Romeo and Juliet' love is the overwhelming subject in the play, but love is a very complicated subject. Shakespeare does not only focus on true love, through out the play he explores many different kinds of love. In fact, Shakespeare does not allow the audience to escape form the idea of love. The most overpowering love in the play is made up of strong emotions, physical attractions and intense commitment - true love: "Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight. For I never saw true beauty till this night" Romeo and Juliet first encounter each other at the Capulet ball and even at first sight they are passionately drawn towards each other. Shakespeare allows the audience to sense the depth and energy of their enraptured feelings almost from the first touch, "If I profane with my unworthiest hand/ This holy shrine, the gentle sin is this:". Shakespeare shows Romeo to be quite experienced with women by the way he speaks to Juliet, "Give me my sin again", and Juliet is easily lured into his witty repart´┐Że of Romeo. Once Romeo and Juliet had been in each other's presence, the thoughts and loving emotions began to flood through their minds. The repeated references to light, "What light", "Juliet is the sun!", bright angel", all indicate the strength of this deep affection and show how Romeo contrasts Juliet with dark, "Arise fair sun and kill the envious moon". In the love scenes between Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare makes it easy to understand how incredible youthful true love is and their emotions are brought out in the play with wonderfully in depth poetry: "Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine That all the world will be in love with the night" Romeo is determined to stay faithful to Juliet and it seems will do anything to reserve her ...read more.

Middle

The Nurse has a maternal love towards Juliet, she is very truthful to her and although in one part of the play she misunderstands Juliet's unwavering love for Romeo, she gives advise to Juliet from the heart, "I think it best you married with the County./ O, he's a lovely gentleman". Juliet looks up to the Nurse as an older, more knowledgeable adult and she finds it easy to talk to her about problems, as the Nurse has a parental quality. After the Capulet's ball, where Romeo and Juliet first meet, the Nurse warns Juliet about Romeo, "His name is Romeo, and a Montague,/ The only son of your great enemy", and this is to show that even from the warnings of a more superior dignitary, it is inevitable that what happens between Romeo and Juliet will end in death, because of the fate acting upon their dominant love. The Nurse views love in a very different aspect and Shakespeare makes it clear that she loves to talk about the sex and money involved in a relationship, "So shall you share all that he doth possess", "you shall bear the burden soon at night". The Nurse has known Juliet since she was very young and is excited at the idea of her getting married: "Thou was the prettiest babe that I ever nursed. And I might live to see thee married once, I have my wish." The idea of Juliet finding her first love is quite astonishing to the Nurse and although she does not understand the strength of this true love, she agrees to help. The Nurse is first worried that Romeo may not be the devoted and reliable man that Juliet is expecting. In Act two, scene four, the Nurse manages to withstand Mercutio's arrogant remarks, "a bawd!", "ancient lady", because she wants to keep her obligations, and find Romeo. Because of the concern and responsibility she feels for Juliet, before making any arrangements, the Nurse first makes it assured that Romeo ...read more.

Conclusion

Before Juliet uses Friar Laurence's plans to have a fake death, she makes sure she leaves her father on a good note and tells him that she has changed her mind and is happy to marry Paris, "Henceforward I am ever ruled by you". Capulet is delighted with Juliets changed approach to the marriage and his mood changes completely, "My heart is wonderous light,/ Since this same wayward girl is so reclaimed". This quote shows how Capulet prefers his daughter not to change in any way and to stay young, innocent and dutiful. Although Juliet's parents do not show much care or love towards her, at her death, but only at her death, they show parental love towards Juliet and are devastated because their only child has suddenly died, "O me, O me! My child, my only life!". Shakespeare allowed many different types of love to be viewed and understood in this play, and I have tried to explain how he has done this with the most important roles of love. The Prince also has a great love for his community and in many ways there is the love between Romeo and his close friends, such as Balthasar, Mercutio and Benvolio, but the most overpowering love in the play is the true love between Romeo and Juliet. The effect of the love between Romeo and Juliet on the audience is very strong, because of the way Shakespeare keeps the story on edge at all times and there are always many things to think about, such as fate. The deaths of Romeo, Juliet and Paris were caused by the powerful true love between Romeo and Juliet just as much as they were caused by the hate between the Montagues and the Capulets, because these two themes are equal. Romeo and Juliet's death had no influence on solving the feud between the Montagues and the Capulets until they were dead. The hate between the two families was so intense that only a tragedy as sad as this would give sadness and grief enough endowment to allow the two families to bond. Lucy Campbell 10W ...read more.

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