• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Discuss the dramatic significance of Act 2 scene 3 of Much Ado About Nothing.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Hamish Livingstone Discuss the dramatic significance of Act 2 scene 3 of Much Ado About Nothing Much Ado About Nothing is a typical Shakespeare comedy about the problems love can cause and how they are overcome. Throughout the play Shakespeare uses misinformation and overhearing (both fairly expected conventions in Shakespeare's plays) as comic devices. The entire play is based around the over exploited subject of love, but uses many other Shakespearian conventions such as disguise for comic value. Shakespeare's audiences expected such devices within plays- which sometimes aloud writers to parody themselves. Act 2 scene 3 opens with Benedict's soliloquy about the folly of love. The entire speech seems to be bitter in tone- and specifically about Claudio having fallen for Hero. When he sees Claudio coming he mocks him calling him "monsieur love". He talks about how that now Claudio "dedicates his behaviours to love" he has changed from being war loving and "plain" speaking to being sentimental and soft. ...read more.

Middle

During the time they are persuading Balthasar to sing Benedick could create some visual humour. He could fidget about - perhaps picking his teeth or preening his hair (showing how vain he is). Or maybe he could just sit and watch them with a bored expression. I would have the song sung extremely badly, and Balthasar could half dance between the others as they lie back to listen. The song is heavily ironic in the situation as it is about men being "deceivers ever"- while they themselves are tricking Benedick. During the song Benedick could exasperatedly put his head in his hands; seemingly offended at how badly it is being sung, looking up only to bitterly mutter that "had he been a dog that should have howled thus, they would have hanged him". At the end of the song, Benedick could get up to leave, only to fall in to the first trap set for him as Don Pedro says "What was it you told me today, that your niece Beatrice was in love with Signor Benedick?". ...read more.

Conclusion

However he could hastily lose this arrogance when he says, "they say I shall bear myself proudly" as if to deny them the satisfaction of being right. There is again irony in this soliloquy as Benedick, listing Beatrice's loveable qualities, lists the exact same qualities he claimed immunity to in his first soliloquy. Throughout the speech he seems to be trying to justify his feelings for Beatrice. He even goes so far as to say "The world must be peopled" as though he were doing the world a favour. He also tries to void his previous declaration that he would die a bachelor by saying he did not think he would "live till I were married". At Beatrice's entrance, I think Benedick hastily trying to look mildly seductive could create some visual humour. This would create the dramatic irony that while Beatrice is completely bemused by his behaviour, the audience would understand what he doing. Shakespearean audiences would generally expect some visual humour in his comedies. For example, there is often a dog sequence to provide some slapstick in Shakespeare's comedies.; ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Much Ado About Nothing section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Much Ado About Nothing essays

  1. What is the Dramatic Significance of Act 2 Scene 1 in 'Much Ado About ...

    In Act 2 Scene 1 Shakespeare notably brings masking into the play, as masking was a great and favourite entertainment in large Elizabethan households. In the film, Branagh also had a chance to express his characters personality through the masks.

  2. Act 4 Scene 1 is often considered a key scene in 'Much Ado About ...

    It shows the differences between the original play and a modern remake. The characters behave differently in this scene to make it more dramatic and alive. Some other characters particularly the men are seen in a bad light. Claudio's friend Don Pedro supports Claudio.

  1. The Tricking Of Benedick - What makes act 2 scene 3 dramatically effective?

    Then about half way through his soliloquy he starts to describe his ideal women. He wants his lady to be perfect. While he is describing his perfect women he uses a repetitive phrase pattern by saying things like, "rich shall be, that's certain," and "fair, or I'll never look on her."

  2. Discuss how Shakespeare creates the character of Benedick in Much Ado About Nothing

    Shakespeare clearly wants us to see that Benedick has a hypercritical side to him; we haven't seen this before in the play. However some personalities still remain in Benedicks character, his use of pretentious is still remaining. Even without reading this long-winded speech, from the structure we can tell this

  1. Explain Benedick's change of heart by the end of Act 2 scene 3 ...

    As well as knowing Benedick is well respected we also hear is strong views against love and marriage in Act1 scene 1. Benedick says 'a professed tyrant to their sex'- meaning he does not like woman. In this scene Claudio confesses to Benedick of his love for Hero.

  2. Consider the effectiveness of Act I, scene I as the opening scene of 'Much ...

    The symmetry of the plot structure is suggestive of a masquerade or a dance, appropiate in a play dominated by spying and deception. The opening scene in which Claudio reveals his love to his friend and patron , who promises to promote it, is followed by two scenes in which spies misreport that confession to thier patrons.

  1. How in "Much Ado About Nothing" does Shakespeare create dramatic tension?

    As Shakespeare chooses for us to hear their misinformed reactions along with the truth from Borachio, this means that as Don Pedro and Claudio are pushed further away from the truth, the tricks have worked and therefore the audience's anxiety grows.

  2. Directing the scene -Tricking Benedict - Much Ado About Nothing

    This is followed by Leonato recognising this and in a slightly louder voice responds ?I would have sworn it had, my lord, especially against Benedick.? I would like him to stress the word Benedick at the end so that it encourages Benedick to listen on to the conversation.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work