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Discuss the dramatic significance of Act Three Scene One in Shakespeare's 'Romeo and Juliet'.

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Introduction

Discuss the dramatic significance of Act Three Scene One in Shakespeare's 'Romeo and Juliet'. Act three Scene One of 'Romeo and Juliet' contains many dramatic moments that have significance which result on the rest of the play. In this scene Shakespeare controls the action, the endurances and exits and the language to manipulate the audience into feeling fear, intrigue, sympathy and sorrow. The scene begins with Benvolio being presented as a worried and nervy character. "Pray thee, good Mercutio, let's retire: The day is hot, the Capulets abroad, And, if we meet, we shall not scape a brawl; For now, these hot days, is the mad blood stirring" The audience see that the two characters on stage Benvolio and Mercutio are the opposites of one and other, Benvolio shy and timid and Mercutio arrogant and witty. The audiences reaction to this I feel would be that if the two were to come across the Capulets' Benvolio would not fight or perform to a standard of Mercutio's standard, I feel myself that Benvolio is only a helper to Mercutio, to help him keep calm and focused. ...read more.

Middle

Mercutio is saying that his wounds from his brawl with Tybalt are not so bad and he will still be there tomorrow, but as we know a "grave man" he will be as he dies just moments later. Romeo enters while Tybalt and Mercutio are still mid argument, but Tybalt tries to end it with Mercutio, "Well, peace be with you, sir: here comes my man" but Mercutio is still quick with his reactions of what he says, he understands what Tybalt is trying to imply about Romeo is being his man, therefore a slave to him and is all the more confused and irritated. Shakespeare I feel has purposefully brought the tension up to an even higher level from Romeo's arrival, as the drama to flow wouldn't be possible without the conflict before. The audience are aware of Romeo's marriage to Juliet in the previous scene and are unsure of what will flow, the line between love and hate is fine but know one is aware of what action Romeo will take. ...read more.

Conclusion

To begin with when Mercutio is stabbed Romeo's love for him is not enough for Romeo to fight Tybalt. "... A plague o' both your houses!" These words of Mercutio show the hurt and betrayal he feels towards Romeo, this is then what makes Romeo want to fight Tybalt. Tybalt leaves the stage just after he kills Mercutio build up the tension that the audience feel. It leaves them wondering the reaction of Romeo and will his marriage to Juliet have any effect on his actions. "... O sweet Juliet, Thy beauty hath made me effeminate." Romeo is frustrated and anger is growing as Tybalt returns to gloat. Romeo sees red and feels he as a duty as the friend of Mercutio to kill Tybalt. Once Romeo has left the Prince enters the stage the audience think that Romeo will be killed for the trouble that has been cause but he is only banished. Shakespeare's play would not of been such a success if Romeo would have killed Romeo at this point, the play would have no suspense and no unexpected changes if the Price would have kept his promise. Janine Slater St. Ambrose Barlow 9252 33369 I ...read more.

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