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Discuss the significance of this quote in relation to the character of Lady Macbeth and her role in the Shakespeare's play Macbeth.

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Introduction

English Essay Discuss the significance of this quote in relation to the character of Lady Macbeth and her role in the Shakespeare's play Macbeth. "A great perturbation in nature, to receive at once the benefits of sleep and do the effects of watching" Act 5.1 Throughout the course of this novel, Lady Macbeth has assisted her husband in his malicious efforts to attain the crown. From the beginning, it is apparent that she is the stronger in the relationship, goading her husband about his masculinity. "What beast was't, then, That made you break this enterprise to me? When you durst do it, then you were a man; And, to be more than what you were, you would Be so much more the man. ...read more.

Middle

After placing the daggers with the watchmen, she excuses herself for not killing Duncan by claiming that he resembled her father as he slept. This is the commencement of the unraveling of human personality and Lady Macbeth's conscience. As Lady Macbeth is sleepwalking, she is attempting to rid her hands of invisible blood. The theme of blood is used much throughout the play. When King Duncan was murdered, it was said by Macbeth, Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood Clean from my hand? No, this my hand will rather The multitudinous seas incarnadine, Making the green one red. Lady Macbeth then replied, My hands are of your colour; but I shame To wear a heart so white. ...read more.

Conclusion

Therefore, a little water could not take on the huge task of clearing Lady Macbeth of all of her evil deeds. Lady Macbeth's sleepwalking is only an additional event to add to the list of perturbations in nature. The chain of being has been colossally disturbed throughout the course of the play, with the murders of King Duncan, the guards, Banquo, and the entire Macduff household. "The night has been unruly: where we lay, Our chimneys were blown down; and, as they say, Lamentings heard i' the air; strange screams of death, And prophesying with accents terrible Of dire combustion and confused events New hatch'd to the woeful time: the obscure bird Clamour'd the livelong night: some say, the earth Was feverous and did shake." (Act II, Scene III) In conclusion, Lady Macbeth's character gradually disintegrates through a false portrayal of unyielding strength, which leads to the immense weight of her guilt, and ultimately, her death. ...read more.

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