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Discuss the similarities between the extract from Charles Dickens ‘Great expectations and Eileen McAuley’s ‘The seduction.’

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Introduction

Discuss the similarities between the extract from Charles Dickens 'Great expectations and Eileen McAuley's 'The seduction.' I was surprised to find many similarities between the two genres. This was surprising because they were written in different centuries by different authors. Some examples of similarities are the characters, settings and styles of writing used by the authors. 'Seduction' by Eileen McAuley conveys the relationship between an innocent young female and an older uneducated male. You may notice that McAuley does not give the boy and girl in the poem names to suggest that it can happen to anyone. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens conveys the relationship between a plebeian named Pip and a self-possessed woman called Estella. In both there is victim, in Seduction the girl is the victim of the boys bullying. It is the other way round in seduction as the girl; Estella is the bully and Pip the younger of the two is the victim. In both writings the younger child is the victim showing that the younger you are the more vulnerable you are. In Seduction the older boy is knowledgeable about the world, "The Quiet blocks of Birkenhead docks," he knows what he is doing, he is experienced and leads her to a rough, rundown ally area away from prying eyes where he can take advantage of an innocent and naive young female. ...read more.

Middle

Miss Haverisham has no respect for Pip or any other man. She constantly calls him a "clumsy labouring boy." There are two reasons for her being insulting, as she is sexist and thinks that she is superior over Pip, you could call her snobish. Miss Havisham has over reacted to what happened to her and is now self absorbed, "Her watch had stopped at twenty minutes to nine and...... a clock in the room," Mrs Havisham was meant to get married but was betrayed waiting at the alter at twenty minutes to nine. This could symbolise when her life ended mentally but not physically and her revenge on men began. Also in both genres there is a victim and a harasser. The victim in seduction is the girl. McAudley shows she is the victim as the boy calls the girl a "little slag." In Great expectation, Pip is the victim. Dickens shows this by Estella saying that Pip has "coarse hands" and having "common boots." Both victims find these nasty things offensive and react in different ways. Pip was "humiliated, hurt, spurned, offended, angry, sorry," Pip has never had this done to him before because of this he doesn't know what to do and he has no good adult figure. Dickens uses many words to describe the way that Pip feels because it shows how hurt he is. ...read more.

Conclusion

This shows that Estella wants no one in so she can inflict her evil upon him and he won't beadle to escape. Also her mother, Miss Havisham hates men and doesn't want to see them. Both authors Dickens and McAudley, try to build tension when the two victims are trapped. When Estella 'locked the gate,' Pip had no where to go. He was inside a house he was unfamiliar with and locked in with strangers. This will cause the audience or reader to feel uncomfortable, as Pip is a small boy and fell sorry for him as he is trapped and cant escape. The audience will also fell uncomfortable when reading 'Seduction' as they read about the girl being lead to where nobody else goes. She is also young and the reader will have by now worked out the plan of the boy, which is to get her drunk and have sex with her. Even though the two writings were written about one hundred years away from each other, there are still some similarities between the two authors styles of writing. Both authors use similes to describe the setting. In 'Seduction,' McAudley describes the setting by saying 'green as a septic wound.' Dickens the author of Great expectations describes the setting by saying 'like the noise of wind.' These similes and metaphors allow the authors to use strong adjectives like 'frightening' used in 'Seduction' and 'enormous lie' in the extract of Great Expectations. William Steed 13th November 2001 ...read more.

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