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Discuss the view that S.H's poems are dull, boring and reflect his own issues. When we started studying Seamus Heaney poems in class, the first poem we read seemed pointless

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Introduction

Discuss the view that S.H's poems are dull, boring and reflect his own issues. When we started studying Seamus Heaney poems in class, the first poem we read seemed pointless and very boring to me. 'Death of a Naturalist' did not enthuse me to read any more Seamus Heaney poems. However, we went on to read five more of his poems and two in particular appealed to me. The first was 'Follower' and the second was 'Mid-Term Break'. They were both exceptionally better than 'Death of a Naturalist' 'Death of a Naturalist' was our introduction to who is known to be one of the greatest living poets. ...read more.

Middle

"...In the porch I met my father crying..." I like this poem more than any of the others because it is simple yet as you read it, you see it is a lot deeper and though provoking. Seamus Heaney seems to have written this poem as though he was detached from the scene and was merely reporting a tragic story. In his writing he describes no emotion, just fact. As I read this poem it made me look beneath the surface of the story and little description and see what was really going on. Seamus Heaney doesn't tell us all the facts but lets us work it out for ourselves. ...read more.

Conclusion

Yet as Seamus Heaney grew up he no longer wanted to work on the farm, he became a poet. Becoming a poet was something that his Father frowned upon. Being a poet is not manly, like working on the farm. In the second to last verse of 'Follower' he tells us as a child he wanted to be just like his Dad e.g. "...I wanted to grow up and plough..." but then in the last verse it switches from the past to the present. He tells us that now it is his Father being a nuisance and stumbling behind him e.g. "...It is my Father who keeps stumbling behind me, and will not go away..." because he never became the son he wanted him to be. ...read more.

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