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Discuss the ways in which Charles Dickens presents the character of Ebenezer Scrooge as being central to the moral message of

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Introduction

Discuss the ways in which Charles Dickens presents the character of Ebenezer Scrooge as being central to the moral message of 'A Christmas Carol'. In the text 'A Christmas Carol', the author Charles Dickens presents the character of Ebenezer Scrooge as central to the moral message in a number of different ways. To identify this, a number of different aspects within the text shall be looked at. These include the morals of the story and the affects of this. The way Ebenezer Scrooge is portrayed as well as what the character he represents. All of these aspects are important in order to deliver the moral messages contained in the text. Some people's perspective is that looking at the message of the story is key in being able to look at the effect Ebenezer Scrooge has on it. The moral message of the book conveys that everyman should be treated as an equal, and it is the duty of every person to help those who are less fortunate. This is mentioned in the first stave of the book where the Ghost of Jacob Marley says: ' It is required of everyman, that the spirit within him should ...read more.

Middle

Charles Dickens does not hint that Ebenezer Scrooge is like this, but he says it at the start of the book: 'Scrooge! A squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scraping, clutching, covetous, old sinner! Hard and sharp as a flint, from which no steel had ever struck out generous fire.' (Stave 1, pg 2) Dickens' portrayal of Scrooge makes the reader dislike him almost immediately. However, as the book goes on, the reader starts to feel sympathetically towards the character. In Stave three the reader becomes aware of a chance of salvation for Scrooge as he expresses pity for Tiny Tim. Of course at the end of the book Scrooge has changed into someone who can, does and will care for other people, rather than the old Scrooge who was the opposite. Through Scrooge's portrayal the moral message is made very clear. Through the story's timeline, Scrooge is representing both ends of the spectrum, the wealthy people who don't care to help the poor; and later he becomes someone who follows the moral code and shows empathy to his fellow man. ...read more.

Conclusion

This change affects the mood of the book accordingly, as the character of Scrooge progresses from dark to enlightened, so too does the tone of the text. "Scrooge was better than his word. He did it all, and infinitely more; and to Tiny Tim, who did not die, he was a second Father" (Stave 5). Having identified and discussed the moral message contained in the text 'A Christmas Carol', and that the way Charles Dickens presents the character of Ebenezer Scrooge, as central to this moral message; Scrooge is clearly shown to be ultimately the key to the story and its pivotal focus. Through the points discussed, it has been sufficiently explained the pivotal role that the character of Scrooge plays, through his representation and the way in which Dickens has portrayed him. As both ends of the spectrum in terms of this moral message, illustrating the consequences of not following this code and that change is indeed possible as well as important. Scrooge is proven to be the central character through whom many important social and political points in historical context of the text; but, through those which are also relevant today. Word count - 1167 ?? ?? ?? ?? Simon Sharp 5 More Mr Walsh ...read more.

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