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Do Stop and Searches Breach Our Privacy?

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Introduction

"Do Stop and Searches Breach our Privacy?" By Luke Warner Since it was first introduced, the 'stop and search' method of countering crime has sparked a fierce debate as to whether these searches are morally right. Happening almost daily, the practice continues to be very controversial, with many claiming that 'stop and searches' breach our right to privacy. In the next couple of paragraphs, I shall attempt to answer the question "do stop and searches breach our privacy?" and learn a little more about the controversial topic. Depending on where in the UK one lives, one is likely to be stopped and searched at least once in their life by a police officer - it has become an inevitable fact. ...read more.

Middle

This fairly ordinary occurrence happens all the time, and is, for many, a regular procedure. It may seem like a harmless, if slightly annoying, chore. Unfortunately, when one looks a little deeper into the facts and statistics, there seems to be a racially-motivated reason why some social groups are more searched than others; black people are six times more likely to be stopped and searched than white people, and Asians are twice as likely. Most people are searched under the Police and Criminal Evidence Act, which gives police officers the permission to perform the act randomly with anybody they suspect of carrying drugs or concealed weapons. The stubbornly high levels are shocking as it would seem that, according to members of the police force, people from ethnic minority groups are more likely to carry illegal drugs or items. ...read more.

Conclusion

A final argument is the low reduction of crime caused by the search, with crime rates dropping by only 0.2%. On the other hand, many claim that it is a necessary way to prevent crime, and is justifiable as an officer should know who is more likely to commit offenses. Some also believe that due to the large amount of crime possibly prevented by 'stop and searches' (in 2009 14,700 people were arrested and 7,500 knives were recovered) the whole thing has helped to make society a safer place. In conclusion, it seems clear that the 'stop and search' method is wrong and has little impact on criminals, and despite the amount of crime prevented, the whole procedure is unnecessary, unfair, bullying, and inefficient. ...read more.

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