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Do you agree with this estimate of Lord of the Flies? Use both the events and the language of the novel in your answer

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Introduction

'A BEAUTIFUL AND DESPERATE NARRATIVE' Do you agree with this estimate of Lord of the Flies? Use both the events and the language of the novel in your answer Beauty is an adjective used to describe many things. However Lord of the Flies is not one of them. It is understandable that some people may believe otherwise. Especially in the first chapter. At the start of the novel the language is very relaxed and the scenes are beautiful. The scenes are slow and very basic. They contain limited information and it is easy to understand. 'The fair boy began to pick his way as casually as possible towards the water. He tried to be offhand and not too obviously uninterested, but the fat boy hurried after him'. ...read more.

Middle

Due to the fact that the events that take place become progressively more distressing and desperate, so to does the language. 'Kill the pig. Cut her throat. Spill her blood'. This is clear indication of the language used. This is not beautiful; it is aggressive and threatening. The narrative has become completely desperate. 'We hit the pig-' '-I fell on top-'. The language has deteriorated and had become very basic and short. Despite this it still remains very threatening. The language becomes progressively more disturbing as do the events on the island. 'Roger ran round the heap, prodding with his spear whenever pigflesh appeared. Jack was on top of the sow, stabbing downward with his knife'. The event that occurs at this point is in itself repulsive but when Golding uses description like 'hot blood spouted over his hands' and 'hot bags of coloured guts', the situation becomes even more nauseating. ...read more.

Conclusion

For a child to see that proves that this novel is not in anyway beautiful. Now both Simon and Piggy are dead, jack and his people go after Ralph in an attempt to kill him. 'He shot forward, burst the thicket, was in the open, screaming, snarling, bloody'. Ralph's desperation to escape forces him to become reduced to an animal. The fact that the other boys want to kill Ralph indicates the intensity of the novel. This occurs very near to the end of the novel, however, everything is still desperate and possibly even more than before. It is from all the evidence above that I conclude that the novel is definitely not beautiful but it is without a doubt one of the most desperate novels I have ever read. Due to this I cannot agree or disagree with the whole estimate, but only with parts of it. ...read more.

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