• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Do you find the first three chapters of Wuthering Heights an effective opening for this novel?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Do you find the first three chapters of Wuthering Heights an effective opening for this novel? In the first chapter of Wuthering Heights, you (the reader) can start to relate to the characters that have been introduced and the setting, Wuthering Heights. The language and the use of imagery play a big role in helping the reader understand the situation in the first few opening paragraphs. The first line reads, 'I [Lockwood] have just returned from a visit to my landlord - the solitary neighbour that I shall be trouble with.' By reading this, you can instantly get the feeling about Lockwood's impression concerning Heathcliff. By describing him as a 'solitary' man, Lockwood is saying that he is alone in his house without any companions to talk to. Therefore, the reader could gather extra information about Heathcliff from the first sentence. There are other descriptive words in the text which help you imagine what type of character Heathcliff is. When Lockwood visits Wuthering Heights, Heathcliff utters ' "Walk in"....with closed teeth', it then does on to say, 'and expressed the sentiment, "Go to the Deuce!"' This will give the reader a mindful impression of what Heathcliff is like with visitors and explains why he is a 'solitary' man. ...read more.

Middle

Lockwood portrays Joseph to be the old servant in the house who is desperate for the job he has. Lockwood notices that Heathcliff treats him unfairly but the only reason Joseph stays is for the job. Lockwood doesn't understand Joseph and the way he speaks so the reader fills Lockwood's shoes. The reader has to try and be aware of what Joseph is talking about, it might be relevant for when you get deeper into the novel. As soon as the reader becomes aware of Joseph and how he talks, it becomes easier to understand the plot. Joseph's language is very biblical which gives the reader a clear understanding that he is religious and believes in his religion very strongly. By introducing a nervous servant character early on in the novel, the reader can then relate to it and try and find out why Joseph is like he is : did something in particular happen to him? The novel begins to fire out all these questions for the reader to answer. Lockwood also gets introduced it Zillah, who is the house-wife. Zillah tells Lockwood that she finds the house 'curious' and she discovers 'quiet goings on' every now and then. ...read more.

Conclusion

Bront( uses a series of techniques (which are still used today) in a very successful way. The contrast between the start and the end surprises the reader and it makes them try and explore the meaning of the novel. The scenery, characters and plot all link together all the way through the novel. This makes it simpler for the reader to get into the plot. By using the characters as narrators, it poses questions for the reader to try and answer which Is a good way of getting the reader to read on. The imagery is very successful and Bront( uses animals to portray the image of what the setting is like. By having one character who is quite mysterious, this also poses questions and gets the reader thinking about what he is truly like. When this novel was wrote, the majority of them were based on aspects of the 1914 life and expresses an idea, although Wuthering Heights is very different as it is based on neither. Therefore, this would make readers back then get more interested in the novel and how it is laid out. The beginning is a very important part of the novel, as it sets the reader up for the rest of the novel. I believe Wuthering Heights does this very well because of it's techniques and characters. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Emily Bronte section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Emily Bronte essays

  1. Methods Emily Bronte uses to engage the interest of the reader in the early ...

    still his bearing was free, almost haughty, and he showed none of a domestic's assiduity in attending on the lady of the house" (Wuthering Heights ch2, p12). Hareton's position in the household is unclear at this stage; his presence confuses Lockwood and the reader.

  2. What impression of Heathcliff emerges in The opening chapters of "Wuthering Heights"?

    This is because he seems to go out of his way not to speak with Lockwood. Heathcliff also portrays the impression that he is isolated. We know this because he lives alone in a house in the middle of the Yorkshire moors, which is a barren place.

  1. Why do you think Emily Bronte employs the device of multiple narrators in Wuthering ...

    Nelly Dean's narrative, though full of detail and amazing accuracy, seems she is describing events she witnessed an hour ago. Her remarkable ability to remember the smallest of details 20 years later makes us question her reliability. Nelly remembers every word, every movement and every detail, which makes her invaluable as a narrator.

  2. Examine why the first critics of Wuthering Heights thought the novel was subversive and ...

    It is because of this that he is able to see Catherine again. After both Cathy and Heathcliff have died, Ellen tells Lockward that "that old man by the kitchen fire affirms he has seen two on 'em looking out of his chamber window, on every rainy night since his death".

  1. Discuss the various themes in depth in Wuthering Heights.

    . . My great miseries in this world have been Heathcliff's miseries, and I watched and felt each from the beginning: my great thought in living is himself. If all else perished, and he remained, I should still continue to be; and if all else remained, and he were

  2. The opening three chapters of Wuthering Heights are very similar to chapters 5, 6 ...

    The actual name, Crythin Gifford, is so fictional, and the idea of it being the nearest town gives the story a more mysterious and extraordinary effect - almost supernatural, because it is not part of the ordinary world that we know of.

  1. Wuthering Heights

    of Wuthering Heights is a world of sadism, violence, and wanton cruelty."5 It is the tenants of the Wuthering Heights that bring the storm to the house. The Earnshaw family, including Heathcliff, grew up inflicting pain on one another. Pinching, slapping and hair pulling occur constantly.

  2. Refer to chapter one of Wuthering Heights and comment on how Emily Brontë introduces ...

    Lockwood often uses elaborate similes such as 'atmospheric tumult' to mean 'storm' which actually suggests that Lockwood is adept at seeing behind the picture and at the under current. But in fact the case is the opposite, demonstrating that Lockwood's behaviour is merely a show, which is almost as shallow as himself.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work