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Do you find the first three chapters of Wuthering Heights an effective opening for this novel?

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Introduction

Do you find the first three chapters of Wuthering Heights an effective opening for this novel? In the first chapter of Wuthering Heights, you (the reader) can start to relate to the characters that have been introduced and the setting, Wuthering Heights. The language and the use of imagery play a big role in helping the reader understand the situation in the first few opening paragraphs. The first line reads, 'I [Lockwood] have just returned from a visit to my landlord - the solitary neighbour that I shall be trouble with.' By reading this, you can instantly get the feeling about Lockwood's impression concerning Heathcliff. By describing him as a 'solitary' man, Lockwood is saying that he is alone in his house without any companions to talk to. Therefore, the reader could gather extra information about Heathcliff from the first sentence. There are other descriptive words in the text which help you imagine what type of character Heathcliff is. When Lockwood visits Wuthering Heights, Heathcliff utters ' "Walk in"....with closed teeth', it then does on to say, 'and expressed the sentiment, "Go to the Deuce!"' This will give the reader a mindful impression of what Heathcliff is like with visitors and explains why he is a 'solitary' man. ...read more.

Middle

Lockwood portrays Joseph to be the old servant in the house who is desperate for the job he has. Lockwood notices that Heathcliff treats him unfairly but the only reason Joseph stays is for the job. Lockwood doesn't understand Joseph and the way he speaks so the reader fills Lockwood's shoes. The reader has to try and be aware of what Joseph is talking about, it might be relevant for when you get deeper into the novel. As soon as the reader becomes aware of Joseph and how he talks, it becomes easier to understand the plot. Joseph's language is very biblical which gives the reader a clear understanding that he is religious and believes in his religion very strongly. By introducing a nervous servant character early on in the novel, the reader can then relate to it and try and find out why Joseph is like he is : did something in particular happen to him? The novel begins to fire out all these questions for the reader to answer. Lockwood also gets introduced it Zillah, who is the house-wife. Zillah tells Lockwood that she finds the house 'curious' and she discovers 'quiet goings on' every now and then. ...read more.

Conclusion

Bront( uses a series of techniques (which are still used today) in a very successful way. The contrast between the start and the end surprises the reader and it makes them try and explore the meaning of the novel. The scenery, characters and plot all link together all the way through the novel. This makes it simpler for the reader to get into the plot. By using the characters as narrators, it poses questions for the reader to try and answer which Is a good way of getting the reader to read on. The imagery is very successful and Bront( uses animals to portray the image of what the setting is like. By having one character who is quite mysterious, this also poses questions and gets the reader thinking about what he is truly like. When this novel was wrote, the majority of them were based on aspects of the 1914 life and expresses an idea, although Wuthering Heights is very different as it is based on neither. Therefore, this would make readers back then get more interested in the novel and how it is laid out. The beginning is a very important part of the novel, as it sets the reader up for the rest of the novel. I believe Wuthering Heights does this very well because of it's techniques and characters. ...read more.

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