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Do you think that Austen makes it possible to feel sympathy for Mrs. Bennet?

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Introduction

Do you think that Austen makes it possible to feel sympathy for Mrs. Bennet? It is my opinion that in the novel Pride and Prejudice, Austen does not make it possible to feel sympathy for Mrs. Bennet as much as feeling a certain fondness for her and her silly ways. She is a very amusing and lovable character, and this is exactly what makes her so exciting to read about. From the very beginning, Austen portrays her as a rather silly and superficial woman. Within the first chapter, she paints complete portrait of her character in jut a few lines. "She was a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper." ...read more.

Middle

Bennet and her husband, who is "so odd a mixture of quick parts, sarcastic humor, reserve and caprice," that he quickly loses interest in his wife after the novelty of being newlywed wears off. He subsequently found ways to amuse himself by frustrating his wife constantly. The reader always takes delight in these tiny conspiracies against Mrs. Bennet. For example, when Mrs. Bennet tried to tell her husband about a very eligible bachelor who had just moved into Netherfield, Mr. Bennet feigned disinterest to purposely aggravate her. He then declares that he shall do no such thing as paying Mr. Bingley a visit. The next day, while Mrs. Bingley laments over not having a proper chance to be introduced, and how they will never have such a golden opportunity pass their way again, Mr. ...read more.

Conclusion

There were also times when her "meanness of understanding" could not be masked, and conversations oft turned awkward when she took offence over nothing. For example, when Darcy was speaking about how there is a greater variety of people in the city, Mrs. Bennet thought that he was slandering the village folk and claimed that they "dine with some four-and-twenty families" at Meryton. Despite all her faults, the reader falls in love with Mrs. Bennet and her "poor nerves." Austen has maneuvered her writing flawlessly and portrays Mrs. Bennet's character beautifully. She is one of the most entertaining characters of Austen's novel; there is no need to feel sympathy for her, as she is a very superficial woman who does not reflect too deeply on her feelings. ...read more.

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