• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Dr. Jekyll and Mr.Hyde

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does Stevenson explore the duality of human nature in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde? I am writing this coursework to show how Stevenson explores the duality of human nature in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Victorian life had 2 side, those who were rich and wealthy and those who were poor and less affluent. This era was a very suspicious time, with dark alleys and odd people with odd houses. This leads on to the same structure as Dr Jekyll and Mr. Hyde in these 2 quotes. (Page 4) "Tramps slouched into the recess and struck matches on the panels; children kept upon the steps; the schoolboy had tried his knife on the mouldings". (Page 4) "The street shone out in contrast to its dingy neighbourhood, like a fire in a forest; and with its freshly painted shutters, well-polished brasses, and general cleanliness and gaiety of note, instantly caught and pleased the eye of the passenger". ...read more.

Middle

This quote shows the dark side of London in the Soho which emphasizes the deep true side of London's dark streets. This mysterious novella uses doors and windows acting as barriers to an unknown hidden side. (Page 15) "The other snarled aloud into a savage laugh; and the next moment, with extraordinary quickness, he had unlocked the door and disappeared into the house." This quote briefly indicates that Mr. Hyde is trying to hide from Mr. Utterson by unlocking the door and running away to leave Mr. Utterson a picture of disquietude for him to solve. (Page 60) "Hence it came about that I concealed my pleasures; and that when I reached years of reflection, and began to look round me and take stock of my progress and position in the world, I stood already committed to a profound duplicity of me." This quotation tells us how great pleasure he feels when Dr. ...read more.

Conclusion

Jekyll, goes to Mr. Utterson with the fear that Dr. Jekyll has been murdered and his murderer, Mr Hyde, is settling in his chambers. Poole serves Jekyll faithfully, and attempts to do a good job and be loyal to him. Yet mysterious events finally drive him into joining forces with Utterson to discover the truth. Enfield is Mr Utterson's cousin and ally to his investigation. He is the person who mentions to the lawyer the actual personality of Jekyll's heir, Mr Hyde. Enfield witnessed Hyde running over a little girl in the street recklessly, and he force Hyde into writing a cheque for the girl's family. Enfield discovers that the cheque was signed by Dr Jekyll. The cheque is found to be genuine. (Page 6-7) "The figure was stiff; but the signature was good for more than that, if it was only genuine." In my own opinions to sum it all up I think that Stevenson lasting moral message is everyone has two people and I can believe that 100% and he is also trying to say be yourself and don't create something that you're not. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Robert Louis Stevenson section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Robert Louis Stevenson essays

  1. Duality in Dr.Jekyll and Mr.Hyde

    He goes as far as being tempted 'to disregard the prohibition' of reading Dr. Lanyon's narrative, which is only meant to be read if Dr. Henry Jekyll died or disappeared. In this way he also illustrates the existence of duality in every individual.

  2. How does Stevenson explore the theme of duality in Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde?

    Of course as is mentioned before that Victorian morality held a dim and grime view of sex, and it would have been considered improper for the respectable Dr. Jekyll to be openly visiting brothels but as Mr Hyde he could do anything!

  1. Dr. Jekyll and Mr.Hyde

    This tell us that they both differentiate from each other and do not enjoy each other company as shown in the story when they go on their Sunday walks because they "said nothing" and "looked singularly dull" the writer

  2. How does Utterson's role in 'Dr.Jekyll and Mr.Hyde' reflect the social concerns of the ...

    Thus, even at the end when he is summoned by Poole to Jekyll's home and all the servants are gathered frightened in the hallway, Utterson stills continues to look for an explanation that preserves reason: "Supposing Dr.Jekyll to have been-well, murdered, what could induce the murderer to stay?

  1. In What Ways Would You Say That the Novella "Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde" ...

    from Dr Lanyon to Jekyll's manservant, confides their thoughts and worries in him. Utterson sees the point of view of almost every character in the story, and does not judge anyone because of this. Another of Utterson's more important aspects is that he does not make friends easily. "his affections...

  2. Prose Study Coursework

    We can decipher what will happen in the immediate future of the novel when Stevenson says 'Silver...was watching his companion like a snake about to spring.' This shows Silver is a conniving, cunning creature, which will do anything to get the treasure, even kill one of his own.

  1. 'Dr.Jekyll and Mr.Hyde' - review

    Description of the house makes reader feel mysterious again. "A certain sinister block of building" "Showed no window" "Blind forehead of discoloured wall" "Marks of prolonged and sordid negligence" "Blistered and distained". It is very strange compared to other houses.

  2. Duality in Dr.Jekyll and Mr.Hyde.

    Hyde is not purely evil either, after having 'trampled calmly' a little, girl, Hyde himself speaks in a sincere manner and offers compensation for his acts. In that way, both sides of Jekyll are both good and evil. The two characters also don't make a divide between love and hate.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work